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College of Liberal and Fine Arts

Marisa Aragon, M.S.

Lecturer
Department of Psychology

Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Phone: (210) 458-5729
Office: MH 4.02.64
Office hours: M 6:00-7:00 pm or by appt.

About
Teaching
  • Degrees

    M.S. in Psychology, University of Texas at San Antonio

  • Recent Courses

    • 3413  Experimental Psychology Lab

Monica Yndo, M.S.

Lecturer
Department of Psychology

Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Phone: (210) 458-8741
Office: MH 4.05.09
Office hours: Th 7:00-8:00 pm & by appt

About
Teaching
  • Degrees

    M.S. in Psychology, University of Texas at San Antonio

  • Recent Courses

    • 3413  Experimental Psychology Lab

Dorothy Flannagan, Ph.D.

Professor and Dean of Graduate School
Department of Psychology

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Phone: (210) 458-4330
Office: PNB 2.210

Research area: Family & Friendship Interaction Patterns, ADHD Attitudes

About
Teaching
Research
Publications
Additional Information
  • Biography

    Dorothy Flannagan received a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of South Carolina, a Master of Arts degree from the University of Richmond, and in 1990, a Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology from North Carolina State University.  She joined the faculty at The University of Texas at San Antonio in the Fall of 1990.  Her research interests include investigating the links between interpersonal communication, cognitive schemas, and behavioral outcomes, as well as investigating individual differences in expectations held for relationship partners.  She has received external funding to support her research from the Spencer Foundation, the Hogg Foundation, and the Department of Health and Human Services.

    Dr. Flannagan served as the Associate Dean in the College of Liberal and Fine Arts and as the Associate Dean for Graduate Studies and Research in the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences.  In 2001, she began her role as Dean of The Graduate School. As Dean, she works with the academic colleges to increase the quality and quantity of academic opportunities and support services available to graduate students. Dr. Flannagan has implemented 20 new doctoral programs and 19 new master’s programs.

    In the Fall of 2009, Dr. Flannagan was named Vice Provost and Dean of The Graduate School.

    Degrees

    • Ph.D. in Psychology, North Carolina State University
    • M.A. in Psychology, University of Richmond
    • B.A. in Spanish, University of South Carolina

     

  • Recent Courses

    • 4113  Cognitive Development
  • Research in Progress

    Grant - Funded
             (2012) Flannagan, D. A. (Co-Principal), "AGEP Planning Grant," Sponsored by NSF, $150,000.00. (2011 - 2012).


    Grant - Currently Under Review
    (2017) Saygin, C. (Co-Principal), Flannagan, D. A. (Principal), Garcia, C. D. (Co-Principal), Ye, K. (Co-Principal), "AGEP-T Collaborative Research: TX BRIDGE (Texans Building Robust Institutional Diversity in Graduate Education) (AGEP: Alliances for Graduate Education and the Professoriate)," Sponsored by National Science Foundation (NSF 12-544), Federal, $193,881.00. (2012 - March 28, 2017).

  • Recent Publications

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  • Department Service
         2007 - Present
         Committee Chair, Psychology Department Scholarship Committee, UTSA


    University Service
         2009 - 2013
         Committee Member, Graduate Education Advisory Committee, Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board

     
    Professional Service

    • Reviewer, Journal Article, Americal Journal of Orthopsychiatry
    • Reviewer, Conference Paper, American Psychological Society
    • Reviewer, Journal Article, British Journal of Psychology
    • Reviewer, Journal Article, Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology
    • Reviewer, Journal Article, Developmental Psychology
    • Reviewer, Journal Article, Head Start
    • Reviewer, Journal Article, Hogg Foundation
    • Reviewer, Journal Article, Journal of Child and Family Studies
    • Reviewer, Journal Article, Journal of Pediatric Psychology
    • Reviewer, Journal Article, Merrill Palmer Quarterly
    • Reviewer, Journal Article, Sex Roles
    • Reviewer, Journal Article, Social and Personal Relationships
    • Reviewer, Journal Article, Social Development
    • Reviewer, Conference Paper, Society for Research in Child Development
    • Reviewer, Conference Paper, Southwestern Psychological Association
    • Reviewer, Conference Paper, Southwestern Society for Research in Human Development
    • 2010 - 2013 - Committee Member, Council of Southern Graduate Schools/Awards Committee

    Professional Memberships

    • 2012 - Present - Council of Southern Graduate Schools
    • 2001 - Present - Council of Graduate Schools
    • 1993 - Present - American Psychological Society
    • 2011 - 2012 - Texas Association of Graduate Schools

Anissa Snyder, M.S.

Lecturer
Department of Psychology

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Phone: (210) 458-8740
Office: MH 4.04.21
Office hours: T/W/Th 11:45-12:45 & by appt.

About
Teaching
  • Recent Courses

    • 1013  Introduction to Psychology
    • 2503  Developmental Psychology
    • 2513  Abnormal Psychology
    • 2533  Social Psychology
    • 3413  Experimental Psychology Lab

     

Ashley Emmerich, M.S.

Lecturer
Department of Psychology

Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Phone: (210) 458-8741
Office: MH 4.05.09
Office hours: W 10:00-11:00 am

About
Teaching
  • Degrees

    • M.S. in Psychology, University of Texas at San Antonio
    • B.A. in Psychology, University of Texas at San Antonio
  • Recent Courses

    • 1013  Introduction to Psychology
    • 2533  Social Psychology
    • 3413  Experimental Psychology Lab

Paul J. Romanowich, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor
Department of Psychology

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Phone: (210) 458-8304
Office: MH 4.02.38
Office hours: T/Th 1:00-2:00 pm & by appt.

Research area: Experimental Psychology

About
Teaching
Research
Publications
Additional Information
  • Biography

    Dr. Paul Romanowich received his PhD in experimental psychology in 2007 from UC San Diego, completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the UTHSC in San Antonio, and was previously an Assistant Professor of Psychology at California State University, Chico. Dr. Romanowich joined the faculty at the University of Texas at San Antonio in 2013.

    Dr. Romanowich has a strong record of research, publishing six peer-reviewed articles since 2007, five of which are first-authored. Most of these publications have centered on applying behavioral analysis methods to generate changes in health behaviors such as smoking abstinence. He has experience in applying for grants and currently has several under review. Dr. Romanowich has a great deal of teaching experience, primarily at the undergraduate level, but has also taught a graduate level survey course in psychology and supervised masters and honors thesis students.

     

     

    Degrees

    • Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio
    • PhD in Experimental Psychology, University of California, San Diego
    • MA in Experimental Psychology, University of California, San Diego
    • BA in German, University of Florida
    • BS in Psychology, University of Florida
  • Recent Courses

    • 1013 Introduction to Psychology
  • Research in Progress

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  • Recent Publications

    Journal Article, Academic Journal - Peer-Reviewed/Refereed

    • Romanowich, P. J., Lamb, R. J., (2013). The effects of chlordiazepoxide and damphetamine during a three-component multiple schedule. In Gregory J. Madden (Eds.), (1st ed., vol. 100, pp. 88-101). Malden, MA: Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.
    • Romanowich, P. J., Lamb, R. J., (2013). The effect of framing incentives as either losses or gains with contingency management for smoking cessation. In Peter Miller (Eds.), (4th ed., vol. 38, pp. 2084-2088). Addictive Behaviors. dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.addbeh.2013.01.007
    • Romanowich, P. J., (2012). Home advantage in retractable-roof baseball stadia. (2nd ed., vol. 115, pp. 559-566). Missoula, MT: Perceptual and Motor Skills: Exercise & Sport.
    • Romanowich, P. J., Lamb, R. J., (2010). The effects of escalating and descendingschedules of incentives on cigarette smoking in smokers without plans to quit. InJesse Dallery (Eds.), (3rd ed., vol. 43, pp. 357-367). Lawrence, KS: Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis.
    • Romanowich, P. J., Lamb, R. J., (2010). The relationship between in-treatmentabstinence. In Suzette M. Evans (Eds.), (1st ed., vol. 18, pp. 32-36). Washington,DC: Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology.
    • Romanowich, P. J., Mintz, J., Lamb, R. J., (2009). The relationship between selfefficacyand reductions in smoking in a contingency management procedure. InSuzette M. Evans (Eds.), (3rd ed., vol. 17, pp. 139-145). Washington, DC:Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology.
    • Romanowich, P. J., Bourret, J., Vollmer, T., (2007). Further analysis of the matching law to describe two- and three point shot allocation in basketball players. In Brian K. Martens (Eds.), (2nd ed., vol. 40, pp. 311-315). Lawrence, KS: Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis.
    • Fantino, E., Romanowich, P. J., (2007). The effect of conditioned reinforcementrate on choice: A review. (3rd ed., vol. 87, pp. 409-421). Lawrence, KS: Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.
    • Fantino, E., Romanowich, P. J., (2006). Context as a variable influencing riskychoice: A review. In Michael Weinberg (Eds.), (3rd ed., vol. 7, pp. 290-300). TheBehavior Analyst Today.
  • Honors and Awards

    • (2012) College of Behavioral and Social Science Grant Writing Competition, CSU Chico.
    • (2010) CSU Chico Research Foundation Explorer Award Summer Grant Writing Competition.
    • (2010) College of Behavioral and Social Science Grant Writing Competition, CSU Chico.
    • (2009) Best Post-Graduate Oral Presentation at Behavior, Biology and Chemistry: Translational Research in Addiction: UTHSCSA; San Antonio, TX.

    Academic and Professional Activities

    • (2010-2011) California Association for Behavior Analysis Board of Directors - Northern California Liaison (elected position)
    • (2010-2011) California Association for Behavior Analysis Board of Directors - Professional Standards Committee
    • Association for Behavior Analysis (member)
    • California Association for Behavior Analysis (member)
    • (2003-2008) Society for the Quantitative Analysis of Behavior (member)
    • (2002-2003) Colloquium Committee, Department of Psychology, University of California, San Diego (elected position)

    Editorial Experience

    • Guest reviewer: Addiction Research & Theory; Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis; Behavioural Processes
    • Invited book reviewer: Thomson Wadsworth Publishing Company

     

     

Alan L. Peterson, Ph.D.

Professor
Department of Psychology

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Phone: (210) 458-8742
Office: 4.02.48

About
Teaching

Ruben Rivas, Ph.D.

Lecturer
Department of Psychology

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Phone: (210) 548-2540
Office: BV 0.358

About
  • Degrees

    Ph.D., Loyola University, Chicago

Judith Perry, Ph.D.

Senior Lecturer and Internship Coordinator
Department of Psychology

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Phone: (210) 458-8545
Office: MH 4.05.14
Office hours: M/W/F 9:30-10:50 am & by appt.

About
Teaching
Additional Information
  • Biography

     

    • Ph.D. Psychology, 2002, University of Tromsø, Norway
    • M.A. Psychology, 1979, California State University at Sacramento
    • B.A. Psychology, 1975, University of California at Davis

     

     

  • Recent Courses

    • 1013  Intro to Psychology
    • 2543  Theories of Learning
    • 3123  Attitudes
    • 3303  Psych Persp on Gender
    • 3523  Psych of Adulthood & Aging
    • 4933  Internship in Psychology
    • 4936  Internship in Psychology

     

  • UTSA:

    • Faculty Senate - 2011 – 2013 
    • Core Curriculum Committee Psychology department – 2010 to present

    Tromso, Norway

    • Served on the following committees: Graduate Planning Committee (1999- 2001), Research Committee (2000-2001), Psychology Department Steering Committee (1998-2000), Regional Ethics Committee (2005)
    • Coordinator of Mellomfag (a special topics program, including a thesis, that was the only means of obtaining an undergraduate minor in psychology), 2002 – 2003.

Charles Feldstone, Ph.D.

Lecturer
Department of Psychology

Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Phone: (210) 548-2540
Office: BV 366
Office hours: T/TH by appt

About
Teaching
Additional Information
  • Degrees

    • Ph.D. in Psychology, Yale University - 1963
    • B.S. in Psychology, Queens College - 1959
  • Recent Courses

    • 1013  Introduction to Psychology
    • 2513  Abnormal Psychology
    • 2543  Theories of Learning
  • Active Memberships

    • American Psychological Association
    • Texas Psychological Association
    • Bexar County Psychological Association
    • San Antonio Group Psychotherapy Society (former Board Member

     

Alan Ashworth, Ph.D.

Lecturer II
Department of Psychology

Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Phone: (210) 458-8740
Office: MH 4.04.21
Office hours: By appt

About
Teaching
Additional Information
  • Degrees

    • Doctor of Philosophy, Cognitive Neuroscience, Yale University
    • Master of Philosophy, Philosophy, Yale University
    • Master of Science, Experimental Psychology, Yale University
    • Bachelor of Arts, Psychology, UTSA
       
  • Recent Courses

    • 2543  Theories of Learning
    • 3103  Cognition
  • Senior Science Advisor - Oversee Air Force BioBehavioral Systems, DoD, 1995 - Present

Eileen Achorn, Ph.D.

Senior Lecturer
Department of Psychology

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Phone: (210) 458-8546
Office: MH 4.04.40
Office hours: M/W 1:00-2:00 pm & W/F 9:00-10:00 am & by appt

About
Teaching
Research
Publications
Additional Information
  • Degrees

    • Ph.D. in Educational Psychology, University of Texas at Austin
    • B.A. in Psychology, University of Texas at Austin

       

  • Recent Courses

    • 1013  Introduction to Psychology
    • 2073  Statistics for Psychology
    • 2503  Developmental Psychology
    • 3403  Experimental Psychology
    • 4133  Social & Personality Development
  • Research in Progress

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  • Recent Publications

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    • Psychology Undergraduate Internship Coordinator, 2010-2013
    • Peer Mentor Program Coordinator, 2013-present

Tina Zawacki, Ph.D.

Associate Professor
Department of Psychology

Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Phone: (210) 458-6580
Office: MH 4.02.42
Office hours: M 3:00-3:50 pm & by appt

Research area: Social behavior and health

About
Teaching
Research
Publications
Additional Information
  • Degrees

    • Ph.D. in Social Psychology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI
    • M.A. in Social Psychology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI
    • B.S. in Psychology, Grand Valley State University, Allendale, MI
  • Recent Courses

    • 3303  Psychology Persp on Gender
  • Research in Progress

    • Alcohol's effects on risk appraisals of and behavioral reactions to potential dating partners during face-to-face social interactions.
    • Ethnic and gender health disparities in sexual risk taking and violence victimization.
    • Further development and testing of a theoretical model of cognitive mediation of risky sexual decision making.

     

     

             

  • Recent Publications

    • Zawacki, T. (2011). Effects of intoxication on women’s risky sexual decision making during social interactions in the laboratory. Psychology of Women Quarterly, 35, 107-118.
    • Zawacki, T., Norris, J., Hessler, D., George, W., Morrison, D., Davis, K., Stoner, S.A., & Abdallah, D. (2009).  Effects of relationship motivation, partner familiarity, and alcohol on women’s risky sexual decision making. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 35, 723-736.
    • Norris, J., Stoner, S., Hessler, D., Zawacki, T., George, W., Morrison, D., &  Davis, K. (2009).  Cognitive mediation of alcohol’s effects on women’s in-the-moment sexual decision making.  Health Psychology, 28(1), 20-28.
    • Zawacki, T. (2008).  Sexual assault.  In Lester R. Kurtz (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Violence, Peace and Conflict (2nd ed). Oxford, UK: Elsevier, pp. 1914-1920.
    • Jacques, A., Abbey, A., Parkhill, M, & Zawacki, T. (2007). Why do some men misperceive women's sexual intentions more frequently than others? An application of the confluence model.  Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 33(11), 1467-1480.
    • Zawacki, T., Norris, J., George, W.H., Abbey, A., Stoner, S.A., Davis, K.C. et al. (2005).  Alcohol and acquaintance sexual assault:  Complementary approaches and convergent findings.  Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, 29(2), 263-269.
    • Zawacki, T., Stoner, S.A., & George, W.H. (2005).  Relapse prevention for sexually risky behaviors.  In G. A. Marlatt  & D.M Donovan (Eds.), Relapse Prevention: Maintenance Strategies in the Treatment of Addictive Behaviors (2nd ed.).  New York, NY:  Guilford Press, pp. 363-386.
    • Norris, J., Masters, N.T., and Zawacki, T. (2004). The cognitive mediation of women's sexual decision making: A theoretical framework.  Annual Review of Sex Research, 15, 258-296.
    • Abbey, A., Zawacki, T., Buck. P., Clinton, A.M., & McAuslan, P. (2004).  Sexual assault and alcohol consumption:  What do we know about their relationship and what types of research are still needed?  Aggression and Violent Behavior, 9, 271-303.
    • Zawacki, T., Abbey, A., Buck, P., McAuslan, P., & Clinton-Sherrod, A.M. (2003).  Perpetrators of alcohol-involved sexual assaults:  How do they differ from other sexual assault perpetrators and nonperpetrators?  Aggressive Behavior, 29, 366-380.
  • Funding

    • 2011-2015, Alcohol, Relationships, and Risk: Women and HIV, National Institute on Drug Abuse/NIH (SC1 DA031962), Role: Principal Investigator
    • 2010 – 2012, Alcohol & Women's Health Risk Reduction: An Innovative Experimental Approach, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism/NIH (R21 AA018403), Role: Principal Investigator
    • 2009 – 2014, Alcohol Effects on Cognitive & Affective Mediation of Women's Decision Making, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism/NIH (R01 AA014512-06-10), Role: Co-Principal Investigator
    • 2003 – 2009, Alcohol & Women's Cognitive Mediation of HIV Risk Taking, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism/NIH (R01 AA014512-01-05), Role: Co-Principal Investigator
    • 2004 – 2008, Alcohol’s Effects on HIV-related Behavioral Skills in the Laboratory, San Antonio Life Sciences Institute, Role: Principal Investigator
    • 2003 – 2007, Women, Alcohol, and HIV Risk:  Examining Dyad Interactions NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (R03 AA0114497), Role: Principal Investigator
    • 2004 – 2006, Alcohol's Effects on HIV-Related Cognitions and Behaviors in Heterosexual Dyads, Alcoholic Beverage Medical Research Foundation, Role: Principal Investigator
    • 2001, Alcohol’s Role in Decisions to Drive after Drinking, NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (F31 AA05576), Individual National Research Award - Predoctoral, Role: Principal Investigator

    Selected Honors and Awards

    • 2010, UTSA Honors Alliance Award for Excellence in Promoting Student Learning
    • 2010, Nominated by students for UTSA Alumni Association Distinguished Faculty Teaching Award
    • 2006, Society for the Scientific Study of Sexuality:  Ira & Harriet Reiss Theory Award
    • 2006 NIH/NCI: Selected to participate in the Advanced Training Institute on Health Behavior Research
    • 2005, NIH/NIAAA: Invited participant in the Working Group on Alcohol-Related HIV/AIDS Research
    • 2003 University of Washington Center for AIDS Research Small Grant Award

    Affiliations

    • American Psychological Association
    • Society for Personality and Social Psychology
    • Texas Research Society on Alcoholism

    Consulting Editor

    • Psychology of Women Quarterly

    Ad Hoc Reviewer

    • Addiction
    • Addictive Behaviors
    • Aggressive Behavior
    • Assessment
    • Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology
    • Drug and Alcohol Dependence
    • Journal of Applied Social Psychology
    • Journal of Behavioral Medicine
    • Journal of Interpersonal Violence
    • The Lancet
    • Persepctive on Sexual and Reproductive Health
    • Journal of Studies on Drugs and Alcohol
    • Psychology of Addictive Behaviors
    • Sex Roles
    • Substance Use & Misuse
    • The Sociological Review
    • Violence and Victims

    Grant Reviewing

    • 2010, Pre-submission grant reviewer for SUNY Buffalo (R21DA030567, PI: K. Miller)
    • 2009, NIH CSR Review Groups: ZRG1 RPHB A-58, ZRG1 RPHB E-58 Reviewed NIH American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Research Challenge Grants
    • 2005, Invited External Grant Reviewer, Early Researcher Grant Award from the  Ministry of Research and Innovation, Government of Ontario

Rebecca Weston, Ph.D.

Associate Professor and PhD Advisor of Record
Department of Psychology

Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Phone: (210) 458-6432
Office: MH 4.02.36

Research area: Interpersonal Violence; Influences of Victimization on Women's Health

About
Teaching
Research
Publications
Additional Information
  • Degrees

    • Ph.D., M.A., The University of North Texas
    • B.A., The University of Texas at Austin
  • Recent Courses

    • 2533  Social Psychology
    • 4193  Relationships
    • 5113  Professional Ethics & Standards (MS level)
    • 5363  Health Psychology (MS level)
    • 7003  Multivariate Statistical Analysis (PhD level)

     

  • Research in Progress

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  • Recent Publications

    REFEREED PUBLICATIONS: ( * indicates student co-author)

    • * Lancaster, S. L., Kloep, M. L., Rodriguez, B. F., Weston, R. (in press). Event centrality, posttraumatic cognitions, and the experience of posttraumatic growth. Journal of Aggression, Maltreatment, and Trauma.
    • * Melka, S. E., * Lancaster, S. L., * Bryant, A. R., Rodriguez, B. F., & Weston, R. (2011). An exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis of the Affective Control Scale in an undergraduate sample. Journal of Psychopathology and Behavior Assessment, 33, 501 – 513.
    • * Lancaster, S. L., Rodriguez, B. F., & Weston, R. (2011). Path analytic examination of a cognitive model of PTSD. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 49, 194 – 201.
    • Temple, J. R., Weston, R. & Marshall, L. L. (2010). Long-term mental health effects of partner violence patterns and relationship termination on low-income and ethnically diverse women. Partner Abuse, 1, 379 – 398.
    • Stockdale, M. S., Logan, T. K., & Weston, R. (2009). Sexual harassment and posttraumatic stress disorder: Damages beyond prior abuse. Law and Human Behavior, 33, 405-418.
    • * Starks, T., Gilbert, B., Fischer, A. R., Weston, R., & DiLalla, D. (2009). Gendered sexuality: A new model and measure of attraction and intimacy. Journal of Homosexuality, 56, 9-14.  Rebecca Weston 3
    • Weston, R., Gore, P.A., Chan, F., & Catalano, D. (2008). An introduction to using structural equation models in rehabilitation psychology. Rehabilitation Psychology, 53, 340-356. Temple, J. R., Weston, R., Stuart, G. L., & Marshall, L. L. (2008). The longitudinal association between alcohol use and intimate partner violence among ethnically diverse community women. Addictive Behaviors, 33, 1244-1248.
    • Weston, R. (2008). Insecure attachment mediates effects of partners’ emotional abuse and violence on women’s relationship quality. Journal of Family Violence, 23, 483-493.
    • * Lovett-Hooper, G., Komarraju, M., Weston, R., & Dollinger, S.J. (2007). Is plagiarism a forerunner of other deviance? Imagined futures of academically dishonest students. Ethics & Behavior, 17, 323-336.
    • Weston, R., Marshall, L. L., & Coker, A. C. (2007). Women’s motives for violent and nonviolent behaviors in conflicts. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 22, 1043 – 1065.
    • * Temple, J. R., Weston, R., Rodriguez, B. F., & Marshall, L. L. (2007). Effects of partner and nonpartner sexual assault on women’s mental health. Violence Against Women, 13, 285- 297.
    • Weston, R. & Gore, P. A. (2006). A brief guide to structural equation modeling. The Counseling Psychologist, 34, 719 – 751.
    • Coker, A. L., Weston, R., Creson, D. L., Justice, B., & Blakeney, P. (2005). PTSD symptoms among men and women survivors of intimate partner violence: The role of risk and protective factors. Violence and Victims, 20, 625-643.
    • Weston, R., * Temple, J. R., & Marshall, L. L. (2005). Gender symmetry and asymmetry in violent relationships: Patterns of mutuality among racially diverse women. Sex Roles, 52, 553-571.
    • * Temple, J. R., Weston, R., & Marshall, L. L. (2005). Physical and mental health outcomes of women in nonviolent, mutually violent and unilaterally violent relationships. Violence and Victims, 20, 335-359.
    • * Kallstrom-Fuqua, A.C., Weston, R., & Marshall, L. L. (2004). Childhood and adolescent sexual abuse of community women: Mediated effects on psychological distress and social relationships. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 72, 980-992.
    • Yuan, K-H., Marshall, L. L. & Weston, R. (2002). Cross-validation by downweighting influential cases in structural equation modeling. British Journal of Mathematical and Statistical Psychology, 55, 125 – 143.
    • Honeycutt, T. C., Marshall, L. L. & Weston, R. (2001). Toward ethnically specific models of employment, public assistance and victimization. Violence Against Women, 7, 126-141.
    • Rebecca Weston 4 Marshall, L. L., Weston, R. & Honeycutt, T. C. (2000). Does men’s positivity moderate or mediate the effects of their abuse on women’s relational quality? Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, 17, 661-676.

    OTHER PUBLICATIONS:

    • Weston, R. & Marshall, L. L. (2007). The role of ethnicity in intimate partner violence. In K. Kendall-Tackett & S. Giacomoni (Eds.), Intimate Partner Violence. Civic Research Institute.

    • Weston, R. & Marshall, L. L. (2001). What causes men’s violence against women? Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, 18, 149-152. (Book Review.)

  • Ph.D. Program Graduate Advisor of Record, Psychology (2012-Present)

    Honors

    • Professor of the Year, SIUC Psi Chi and Psychology Student Association, 2006
    • The Counseling Psychologist’s 2006 Outstanding Contribution Award for Weston and Gore (2006), A Brief Guide to Structural Equation Modeling

    Funding

    • September, 2005 to August, 2009, Using batterer psychological profiles for prevention of partner violence. National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, CDC #1R49CE000606-01, PI: Ann L. Coker, Co-PI: Rebecca Weston
    • September, 2006 to January, 2008, Center for rural violence and justice studies. Bureau of Justice Assistance, PIs: Joseph A. Schafer, Jennifer Dunn, Rebecca Weston
    • June, 2004 to May, 2005, Sexual violence in childhood and adulthood: Effects on physical and mental health among low-income women. Southern Illinois University, Faculty Seed Grant Program, PI: Rebecca Weston
    • September, 2001 to August, 2004, The context, motives and meaning of partner violence: Effects on women’s health and use of the justice system. National Institute of Justice, # 2001-WT-BX-0504, PIs: Linda L. Marshall and Rebecca Weston

    Affiliations

    • International Association for Relationship Research
    • American Psychological Association (Divisions 5, 9, and 35)
    • Association for Psychological Science
    • International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies
    • SPSSI Junior Scholars Professional Development Task Force (2005 – 2007)

    Editorial Board Membership

    • Journal of Social and Personal Relationships (2006 – present)

    Ad Hoc Reviewing

    • American Journal of Community Psychology
    • Journal of Interpersonal Violence
    • Journal of Traumatic Stress
    • Personal Relationships
    • Violence Against Women
    • Violence and Victims
    • Psychology of Women Quarterly
    • Sex Roles

Rebekah E. Smith, Ph.D.

Associate Professor
Department of Psychology

Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Phone: (210) 458-7301
Office: MH 4.02.18

Research area: Cognitive Psychology; Cognitive Aging

About
Teaching
Research
Publications
Additional Information
  • Degrees

    • Post-doctoral training, Cognitive Aging, Georgia Institute of Technology and The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    • MA, Ph.D. in Cognitive Psychology, The University of North Carolina at Greensboro
    • BS in Mathematics, Tulane University
  • Recent Courses

    • 3103  Cognition
  • Research in Progress

     

     

     

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  • Recent Publications

    • Smith, R. E., Horn, S. S., & Bayen, U. J. (in press). Prospective memory in young and older adults: The effects of ongoing task load. Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition.
    • Pavawalla, S. P., Schmitter-Edgecombe, M., & Smith, R. E. (2012). Prospective memory following moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury: A Multinomial modeling approach. Neuropsychology, 26, 91-101.
    • Smith, R. E. (2011). Providing support for distinctive processing: The isolation effect in young and older adults. Psychology and Aging, 26, 744-751.
    • Smith, R. E., Persyn, D., & Butler, P. (2011). Prospective memory, personality, and working memory: A formal modeling approach. Zeitschrift für Psychologie/Journal of Psychology, 219, 108-116.
    • Loft, S., Smith, R. E., & Bhaskara, A. (2011). Prospective memory in an air traffic control simulation: External aids that signal when to act. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, 17, 60-70.
    • Smith, R. E., & Engle, R. W. (2011). Study modality and false recall: The influence of resource availability. Experimental Psychology, 58, 117-124.
    • Smith, R. E. (2010). What costs do reveal and moving beyond the cost debate: Reply to Einstein and McDaniel (2010). Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 36, 1089-1095.
    • Smith, R. E., Bayen, U. J., & Martin, C. (2010). The cognitive processes underlying event-based prospective memory in school age children and young adults: A formal model-based study. Developmental Psychology, 46, 230-244.
    • Smith, R. E., Hunt, R. R., & Gallagher, M. P. (2008). The effect of study modality on false recognition. Memory & Cognition, 36, 1439-1449.
    • Smith, R. E. (2008). Connecting the past and the future: Attention, memory, and delayed intentions. In M. Kliegel, M. A. McDaniel, & G. O. Einstein (Eds.), Prospective memory: Cognitive, neuroscience, developmental, and applied perspectives (pp. 27-50). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc.
    • Smith, R. E., Hunt, R. R., McVay, J.C., & McConnell, M. D. (2007). The cost of event-based prospective memory: Salient target events. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 33, 734-746.
    • Smith, R. E., & Bayen, U. J. (2006). The source of adult age differences in event-based prospective memory: A multinomial modeling approach. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 32, 623-635.
    • Smith, R. E., Lozito, J., & Bayen, U. J. (2005). Adult age differences in distinctive processing: The modality effect in false recall. Psychology & Aging, 20, 486-492.
    • Smith, R. E., & Bayen, U. J. (2004). A multinomial model of event-based prospective memory. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 30, 756-777.
    • Smith, R. E. (2003). The cost of remembering to remember in event-based prospective memory: Investigating the capacity demands of delayed intention performance. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 29, 347-361.
  • Selected Honors

    • The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    • 2003 Gordon H. DeFriese Career Development in Aging Research Award for Junior Faculty/Staff, National Institute on Aging and the Brookdale Foundation
    • 2000 Selected to participate in the Summer Institute on Aging Research
    • American Psychological Foundation and the Council of Graduate Departments of Psychology, 1998  Graduate Research Scholarship
    • The University of North Carolina at Greensboro, 1998  Dr. John W. Lindsey Memorial Award for Excellence in Scholarship and Research

    Recent Funding Awards

    • 2009-2014 Aging, Improving Prospective Memory, and a Formal Model, Grant Number: SC1 AG034965, NIH, National Institute on Aging, Role: Principal Investigator
    • 2009-2011 Aging, Improving Prospective Memory, and a Formal Model, ARRA Administrative Supplement, Grant Number: SC1 AG034965-01S1, NIH, National Institute on Aging, Role: Principal Investigator

    Affiliations

    • Association for Psychological Science
    • American Psychological Association
    • Psychonomic Society
    • Midwestern Psychological Association
    • Southwestern Psychological Association

    Associate Editor

    • Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 2012-present

    Guest Editor

    • Zeitschrift für Psychologie/Journal of Psychology - 2011 special issue on prospective memory

    Consulting Editor

    • Experimental Psychology, 2009-2010
    • Memory and Cognition, 2009-present
    • Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 2010-2011

Michael P. Ryan, Ph.D.

Associate Professor
Department of Psychology

Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Phone: (210) 458-5715
Office: MH 4.04.42
Office hours: T/TH 10:00-11:00 am & by appt

Research area: Individual Differences in comprehension and learning

About
Teaching
Research
Publications
Additional Information
  • Biography

    I received my Ph.D. in psychology from Stanford University in 1975. Initially, my research area was Personality and Psychopathology, and I worked with Walter Mischel and Albert Bandura. However, the emerging information-processing models of mind soon began to fascinate me, and I began working with Richard Atkinson, Gordon Bower, and Roger Shepard. Working in addition with Albert Hastorf, I also developed an enduring interest in the history of psychological thought. Under the direction of Albert Hastorf and Gordon Bower, I completed my dissertation on the control processes governing retrieval efforts in long-term memory.

    During a subsequent two-year postdoctoral fellowship at the Educational Testing Service in Princeton, New Jersey, I worked with Roy Freedle and Richard Hurtig at ETS and with Tom Trabasso at Princeton University. These partnerships introduced me to newly emerging paradigms for studying discourse comprehension and production. It was there too that I became intrigued with diagnostic program evaluation, as artfully demonstrated in the well-known ETS analysis of the impact of Sesame Street viewing on the development of cognitive skills in young children.

    Accepting an appointment as an Assistant Professor in the Division of Social Sciences at the University of Texas at San Antonio in the Fall of 1976, I found myself in the company of a young and energetic group of anthropologists, geographers, historians, political scientists, psychologists, and sociologists. I expanded my dissertation work on memory control processes to explore the controlling role of naïve beliefs about knowledge and learning in the development of reading and writing strategies among adult learners. Upon earning tenure and the rank of Associate Professor in 1984, my general interest in self-regulatory processes led me to spend several years working with a litigation consultant on the design and evaluation of warning labels in consumer products.

    My work in program evaluation and learning strategies led me in the early 1990s to conduct research on academic socialization as a factor in college-student retention and graduation rates. Working with academic support components in student services, I helped develop and evaluate a number of interventions to support the academic socialization of first-generation college students. This work led to recognize the need for a Teaching and Learning Center to aid faculty in improving their teaching by helping them understand the cognitive processes that underlie active learning in the classroom. I became the Founding Director for the Teaching and Learning Center in 1997 and served in that role until 2000, when I had an opportunity to spend a sabbatical year at the United States Military Academy at West Point. There I worked with the Center for Teaching Excellence and with Department Chairs to foster the development of collaborative-learning strategies.

    With the creation of a Department of Psychology and the development of graduate programs in psychology, I have been focusing for the past five years on two research programs in which I help undergraduate and graduate students develop and expand their conceptual, methodological, and analytical skills. The first research program involves an analysis of the degree to which cognitive factors limit the ability of individuals to develop adequate mental representations of problem-based group discussions. I have been collecting data using a paradigm in which I focus simply on the degree to which individuals can successfully construct a dynamic mental representation—a situation model—of the scripted contributions that four actor-discussants make to a pre-recorded conversation. The second research program involves a cognitive analysis of the basis for the antidepressant benefits of physical activity. Currently, I am using Social Cognitive Theory as a framework to examine two interrelated issues: the determinants of ethnic and gender differences in the physical activity levels of young adults and the contribution that psychosocial factors (such as self-esteem and self-efficacy) make to the mental-health benefits of physical exercise.

    Degrees

    • Ph.D. in Cognitive Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA
    • B. A. in Psychology, Pomona College, Claremont, CA
  • Recent Courses

    • 2573 Psychology of Thought
    • 3103 Cognition

     

  • Research in Progress

    • Knowledge-updating and health literacy
    • The effects of prior knowledge on the comprehension and recall of health-protective information.
    • The effects of text structure on the comprehension and recall of health-protective information.
    • The impact of psychosocial variables on the comprehension and recall of health-protective information.
  • Recent Publications

    • Ryan, M. P. (October 2010). Using Product-Label Information To Correct Pre-Conceptions About The Safe And Effective Use Of Over-The-Counter Analgesics. Health Literacy Annual Research Conference: Bethesda MD.
    • Ryan, M. P. (2010). Psychocultural differences in physical activity-based antidepressant effects. Mental Health and Physical Activity, 3(1), 5-15.
    • Ryan, M. P. (2008). The antidepressant effects of physical activity: Mediating self-esteem and self-efficacy variables. Psychology and Health, 23(3), 279-307.
    • Ryan, M. P. (2005). Physical activity levels in young adult Hispanics and Whites: Social cognitive theory determinants. Psychology and Health, 20(6), 709-727.
    • Ryan, M. P. (2004). What do first-year students need most: Learning strategies instruction or academic socialization?  Journal of College Reading and Learning, 34, 4-28.
    • Ryan, M. P., & Glenn, P. A. (2002). Increasing one-year retention rates by focusing on academic competence: An empirical odyssey. Journal of College Student Retention, 4, 297-324.
    • Ryan, M. P. (2001). Conceptual models of lecture learning:  Guiding metaphors and model-appropriate notetaking practices. Reading Psychology, 22, 289-248.
  • Honors and Awards

    • U.S. Public Health Service Postdoctoral Fellow, 1974-1976. Educational Testing Service, Princeton, N.J.
    • Sabbatical Grant from the United States Military Academy at West Point, 2000-2001.
    • Appointment with the Center for Teaching Excellence in the Office of the Dean.

    Academic and Professional Activities

    • Health and Research
    • Division of Health Psychology, British Psychological Society
    • Founding Director of the Teaching and Learning Center, University of Texas at San Antonio

David R. Pillow, Ph.D.

Associate Professor
Department of Psychology

Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Phone: (210) 458-5727
Office: MH 4.04.14
Office hours: M/W 2:00-3:15 & by appt

Research area: Social & Clinical Psychology / Quantitative Methods

About
Teaching
Research
Publications
Additional Information
  • Degrees

    • Ph.D. in Social Psychology, Arizona State University (1991)
    • M.A. in Social Psychology, Arizona State University (1987)
    • B.A. in Psychology, University of Texas at Arlington (1982)
  • Recent Courses

    • 2073 Statistics for Psychology
    • 4013 Social Psychology of the Self
    • 6213 Correlation and Regression Analysis

     

  • Research in Progress

    • attitudes about Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)
    • the assessment of belongingness as a moderator of stress and predictor of well-being
    • perceptions of hypocrisy in judging self and others
  • Recent Publications

    Refereed Journal Articles

    • Pillow, D. R., Bradley, L. J., Malone, G. P. (in press). Beliefs Regarding Stimulant Medication Effects Among College Students With a History of Past or Current Usage. To appear in Journal of Attention Disorders. (In Press)
    • Malone, G. P., Pillow, D. R., & Osman, A. (2012). The General Belongingness Scale (GBS): Assessing achieved belongingness. Personality and Individual Differences, 52, 311-316.
    • Coyle, T. R., & Pillow, D. R. (2008). SAT and ACT predict college GPA after removing g. Intelligence, 36, 719-729.
    • Hoza, B., Johnston, C., Pillow, D.R., Ascough, J.C. (2006).  Predicting Treatment Response for Childhood Attention-Defict/Hyperactivity Disorder:  Introduction of a Heuristic Model to Guide Research.  Applied and Preventive Psychology, 11, 215-229.
    • Pillow, D.R., & McNaughton Cassill, M.E. (2001). Media Exposure, Perceived Similarity and Counterfactual Regret: Why did the Public Grieve when Princess Diana Died? Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 31 (10), 2072 2094.
    • Pillow, D. R., Barrera, M., & Chassin, L. (1998). Using cluster analysis to assess the effects of stressful life events: probing the impact of parental alcoholism on child stress and substance use.Journal of Community Psychology, 26, 361-380.
    • Pillow, D. R., Zautra, A. J., & Sandler, I. (1996). Major life events and minor stressors: Identifying mediational links in the stress process.Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 70, 381-394.
  • Honors and Awards

    • Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, Editorial Board Member
    • UTSA Faculty Research Award, Summer, 1995, 2001, 2003

    Affiliations

    • Society for Personality and Social Psychology

Augustine Osman, Ph.D.

Professor and Associate Dean, College of Liberal and Fine Arts
Department of Psychology

Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Phone: (210) 458-6854
Office: MH 04.01.52C
Office hours: T 2:30-3:30 & by appt

Research area: Clinical, Applied Behavior Analysis, and Behavioral Medicine

About
Teaching
Research
Publications
Additional Information
  • Degrees

    • M.A., Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology, West Virginia University
    • B.A. Magna Cum Laude in Psychology & Philosophy, West Virginia University
  • Recent Courses

    • 2513 Abnormal Psychology
    • 3543 Intro to Clinical Psychology
    • 5313 Seminar in Psychopathology 
    • 7113 Adv Topics in Clinical Psychology
  • Research in Progress

    • Evidence Based Assessment
    • Psychometrics
    • Assessment of Anxiety and Mood Disorders, Suicide, Pain, and Eating Disorders
  • Recent Publications

    • Gutierrez, P. M., Freedenthal, S., Wong, J. L., Osman, A., & Norizuki, T. (in press). Validation of the Suicide Resilience Inventory-25 (SRI-25) in adolescent psychiatric inpatient samples.  Journal of Personality Assessment.
    • Malone, G. P., Pillow, D. R., & Osman, A. (2012). The General Belongingness Scale (GBS): Assessing achieved belongingness. Personality and Individual Differences, 52, 311-316.
    • Freedenthal, S., Lamis, D. A., Osman, A., Kahlo, D., & Gutierrez, P. M. (2011).  Evaluation of the psychometric properties of the Interpersonal Needs Questionnaire-12 in samples of men and women.  Journal of Clinical Psychology, 67(6), 609-623.
    • Osman, A., Freedenthal, S., Gutierrez, P. M., Wong, J. L., Emmerich, A., & Lozano, G. (2011).  The Anxiety Depression Distress Inventory-27 (ADDI-27): A short version of the Mood and Anxiety Symptom Questionnaire-90.  Journal of Clinical Psychology, 67(6), 591-608.
    • Osman, A., Bagge, C. L., Freedenthal, S., Gutierrez, P. M., & Emmerich, A. (2011).  Development and evaluation of the Social Anxiety and Depression Life Interference-24 (SADLI-24) inventory.  Journal of Clinical Psychology, 67(1), 82-98.
    • Osman, A., Gutierrez, P. M., Wong, J. L., Freedenthal, S., Bagge, C. L., & Smith, K. D. (2010).  Development and psychometric properties of the Suicide Anger Expression Inventor-28.  Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment, 32, 595-608.
    • Osman, A., Gutierrez, P. M., Smith, K., Fang, Q., Lozano, G., & Devine, A. (2010). The Anxiety Sensitivity Index—3: Analyses of dimensions, reliability estimates, and correlates in nonclinical samples. Journal of Personality Assessment, 92(1), 45-52.
    • Gutierrez, P. M., & Osman, A. (2009). Getting the best return on your screening investment: Maximizing sensitivity and specificity of the Suicidal Ideation Questionnaire and Reynolds Adolescent Depression Scale. School Psychology Review, 38(2), 200-217.
    • Osman, A., Williams, J. E., Espenschade, Gutierrez, P. M., Bailey, J. R., & Chowdhry, (2009). Further evidence of the reliability and validity of the Multidimensional Scale for Children (MASC) in psychiatric inpatient samples. Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment, 31, 202-214.
    • Gutierrez, P. M., & Osman, A. (2008). Adolescent Suicide: An integrated approach to the assessment of risk and protective factors. Northern Illinois University Press. DeKalb. IL.
  • Honors and Awards

    • Board of Regents Award for Faculty Excellence, 2000
    • CSBS Award for Faculty Excellence, 1999
    • University Summer Fellowship, 1995, 1999

    Affiliations

    • Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT)
    • American Psychological Association (APA; Divisions 12 and 53)
    • Association for Psychological Science (APS)
    • Fellow, American Academy of Assessment Psychology
    • Diplomate, American Board of Assessment Psychology (ABAP)

    Consulting Editor

    • Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment
    • Psychological Assessment

    Ad hoc reviewer

    • Journal of Clinical Psychology
    • Professional Psychology: Research and Practice Assessment
    • Psychological Bulletin

Mary McNaughton-Cassill, Ph.D.

Associate Professor
Department of Psychology

Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Phone: (210) 458-6839
Office: MH 04.02.32
Office hours: M/W 11:00 am-12:00 pm

Research area: Clinical Psychology

About
Teaching
Research
Publications
Additional Information
  • Biography

    Dr. McNaughton-Cassill received her  Ph.D.  in 1991 from the University of California, San Diego- San Diego State University Joint Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology, with an emphasis on Behavioral Medicine. Her research involved Psychological and Psychoimmunological  explorations of stress responses among elderly Alzheimer’s Disease Caregivers.  She also holds a Master’s Degree in Psychology from the University of California, Santa Barbara, Psychology  with an emphasis on Physiological Psychology, where her research involved the study of  glucocorticoid responses to stress in rats.  She is currently an Associate Professor and the Associate Dean of Undergraduate Affairs for the College of Liberal and Fine Arts.

    Dr. McNaughton-Cassill started teaching Psychology since 1984 as a Community College Instructor and an Adjunct Professor, and  currently teaches Theories of Learning, Psychology and Health, Abnormal Psychology and Stress Management, Physiological Psychology, and team teaches  an Honor’ Course on the Science and Psychology of Everyday Live. She also works with undergraduate and graduate students as a research mentor, and is the advisor for the Student Psychological Association and the Mortar Board Honor’s Society.

    She has worked as a Clinical Psychologist with College Student Populations, with an Outpatient Schizophrenia Program and on  a Spinal Cord Injury Unit, and with Nursing Home Populations.  She has also  led stress  management groups and conducted research on the stress couple’s experience when undergoing In Vitro Fertilization treatment for Infertility.

    Her current research interests include the evaluation of the interaction of stress  including the news media and the technological characteristics of modern life with cognitive and personality factors to  impact mental and physical health. She is also looking at the psychological  impact of high stakes standardized testing on elementary school children and their  families. She has received research funding from the Minority Biomedical Support program through NIH, M-RISP, and at  UTSA.

    Degrees

    • Ph.D., Clinical Psychology, University of California, San Diego-San Diego State University Joint Doctoral Program, 1991
    • M.A., Psychology, University of California, Santa Barbara, 1983
    • B.A., Psychology, University of California, Santa Barbara, 1981
  • Recent Courses

    • 2513  Abnormal Psychology
    • 2543  Theories of Learning
    • 4183  Physiological Psychology
    • 4253  Psychology of Health
    • 4953  Sp Studies: Stress
    • 5383  Biological Psychology
  • Research in Progress

    .

  • Recent Publications

    Book

    McNaughton-Cassill, M.E. Mind the Gap: Managing Stress in the Modern World (2013). San Diego, California: Cognella Academic Press.

    Publications in Refereed Journals

    • Osman, A., Lamis, D. A., Freedenthal, S., Gutierrez, P. M., & McNaughton-Cassill (in press). The Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support: Analyses of internal reliability, measurement invariance, and correlates across gender. Journal of Personality Assessment.
    • Bryan, C.J., Andreski, S.R., McNaughton-Cassill, M. & Osman, A. (in press) Agency is associated with decreased emotional distress and suicidal ideation in military personnel. Archives of Suicide Research.
    • Bryan, C.J., Elder, W.B., McNaughton-Cassill, M., Osman, A., Hernandez, A.M., & Allison, S. (in press). Meaning in life, emotional distress, suicidal ideation, and life functioning in an active duty military sample. Journal of Positive Psychology.
    • Bryan, C.J., McNaughton-Cassill, M. & Osman, A. (In press). Age and belongingness moderate the effects of combat exposure on suicidal ideation among active duty Air Force personnel. Journal of Affective Disorders.
    • Bryan, C.J., Elder, W.B., McNaughton-Cassill, M., Osman, A., Hernandez, A.M., & Allison, S. (2013). Meaning in life, emotional distress, suicidal ideation, and life functioning in an active duty military sample. Journal of Positive Psychology, 8(5), 444-452.
    • Hannon, B. and McNaughton-Cassill, M. (2011). SAT performance: Understanding the contributions of cognitive/learning and social/personality factors. Applied Cognitive Psychology, n/a.doi: 10.1002/acp.1725.
    • McNaughton-Cassill, M. Novian, D.A., Holmes, T.L.,& Smith, T.L. (2009). Emotional stress and coping in response to television news coverage of the 9/11 terrorist attacks. Journal of Media Psychology V 14 (1) Winter, 2009.
    • Meier, J A., McNaughton-Cassill, M., Lynch, M. (2006). The Management of household and childcare tasks and relationship satisfaction in dual-earner families. Marriage & Family Review, 40: 2/3, 61, 88.
    • McNaughton-Cassill, M.E., Bostwick, J.M., Arthur, J., Robinson, R.D., & Neal, G.S. (2005). Brief cognitive behavioral couples support groups developed to manage the stress of IVF treatment. In Oxington, K.V. (Ed). Stress and Health New Research (pp. 187-201). New York: Nova Biomedical Books.
    • McNaughton-Cassill, M. E., Bostwick, J.M., Arthur, N.J., Robinson R. R., & Neal, G.S. (2002). The efficacy of brief couples support groups developed to manage the stress of In Vitro Fertilization treatment. Mayo Clinic Proceedings, 77, 1060-1066.
    • McNaughton-Cassill, M. E., & Smith., T.S. (2002). My world is OK, but yours is not: Television news, the optimism gap, and stress. Stress & Health 18, 27-33.

     

  • Honors and Awards

    • 2011 Richard S. Howe Excellence in Service to Undergraduates Teaching Award
    • 2010 UT System Regents' Outstanding Teaching Award
    • 2010-2011  Principle Investigator on SALSI Grant  with Dr. Augustine Osman and Dr. Craig Bryan, UTHSCSA. Analysis of Risk and Protective Factors for Trauma-Related Events
    • 2008 Faculty Research Award. Co-Investigator with Dr. Augustine Osman. Development of a Measure of Media Malaise.
    • Received 3 Year M-RISP  Grant with  Dr. B. Hannon from the NIH entitled: Longitudinal a Investigation of the Attitudinal/Belief and Learning/Cognitive Factors that contribute to Test Anxiety in European-American and Hispanic Students.
    • Received 3 Year Minority Biomedical Research Support Grant from the NIH  for a project entitled:  News Media Exposure, Stress and Psychological Well-Being.

    Academic and Professional Activities

    • American Psychological Association
    • Southwestern Psychological Association
    • Texas Psychological Association, Disaster Response San Antonio, Representative
    • Member of the Continuing Education Committee, Southwestern Psychological Association
    • Advisor for Student Psychological Association, UTSA
    • Advisor for Mortar Board, UTSA

Deborah L. Mangold, Ph.D.

Associate Professor
Department of Psychology

Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Phone: (210) 458-7301
Office: MH 4.05.14
Office hours: T/TH 5:30-6:00 pm & 7:15-7:45 pm & by appt

Research area: Biological Psychology, Psychoneuroendocrinology, Stress, Psychopathology and Health

About
Teaching
Research
Publications
Additional Information
  • Biography

    Dr. Deborah L. Mangold received her B.S. in Psychology at The Johns Hopkins University, M.S. in Clinical Psychology at The Loyola College in Maryland and Ph.D. in Biological Psychology at Howard University.  Dr. Mangold’s doctoral dissertation focused on an examination of the effects of the opioid antagonist naloxone on the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal (HPA) axis in non-dependent individuals with a family history of alcoholism.  Her doctoral thesis was completed under the direction of Dr. Gary Wand, in his laboratory at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

    Following the completion of her doctoral dissertation, Dr Mangold completed post-doctoral training in Neuroendocrinology and Human Genetics at the Brain Research Institute, The University of California, Los Angeles, in the laboratories of Dr. Anna Taylor and Dr. Ernest Noble.   Dr. Mangold joined the faculty of the Department of Psychology at UTSA in 2003 and is currently a member of the American Psychological Society, The Southwestern Psychological Society and the Research Society on Alcoholism.

    While at UTSA, Dr. Mangold’s program of research continues to focus on the HPA and opioid systems and has recently expanded to include investigations of the effects of genotype, acculturative stress and familial violence on neurohormonal, immune and health outcomes.

    Degrees

    • Postdoctoral Training, Endocrinology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine,
    • Postdoctoral Training, Brain Research Institute, University of California, Los Angeles
    • Ph.D. in Biological Psychology, Howard University
    • M.A. in Clinical Psychology, Loyola College
    • B.S. in Psychology, John Hopkins University
  • Recent Courses

    • 2513 Abnormal Psychology
    • 4183 Physiological Psychology
    • 4253 Psychology & Health
    • 7103 Adv Topics in Biopsychology

     

  • Research in Progress

    Biomarkers for Psychopathology Stress, Allostatic Load, and Health

  • Recent Publications

    • Wand, G. S., Mangold, D. L., ElDeiry, S., McCaul, M. E. & Hoover, D. (1998).  Family history of alcoholism and hypothalamic opioidergic activity. Arch Gen Psych, 55, 1114-1119.
    • Wand, G. S., Mangold, D. L., Ali, M. & Gigey, P. (1999).  Adrenocortisol responses and family history of alcoholism.  Alcoholism Clin Exp, 23, 1185-1190.
    • Wand, G. S., Mangold, D. L. & Ali, M. (1999).  Adrenocorticotropin responses to naloxone in sons of alcohol-dependent men.  J Clin Endodcrin and Metab, 84(19), 64-68.
    • Mangold, D. L., Peyrot, M., Gigey, P. & Wand, G. S. (2000).  Endogenous opioid activity is associated with obsessive-compulsive symptomatology in individuals with a family history of alcoholism.  Neuropsychopharmacology, 22(6), 595-607.
    • Mangold, D. L., McCaul, M. E., Ali, M. & Wand, G. S. (2000). Plasma adrenocorticotropin responses to opioid blockade with naloxone: Generating a dose response curve in a single session.  Biological Psychiatry, 48, 310-314.
    • Mangold, D. L. & Wand, G. S. (2006).  Cortisol and adrenocortioctropic hormone responses to Naloxone in subjects with high and low neuroticism. Biological Psychiatry 60, 850-855.Cortisol and ACTH Responses to naloxone in subjects with high and low neuroticism.
    • Mangold, D. L., Veraza, R., Kinkler L., and Kinney, N. (2007). Neuroticism predicts acculturative stress in Mexican-American college students. Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences, 29 (3), 366-383.
    • Mangold, D. L., Wand, G. S., Javors, M. & Mintz, J. (2010). Childhood trauma, Acculturative stress and the cortisol awakening response in Mexican American adults. Hormones and Behavior, 58, 637-646.
    • Mangold, D. L., Marino, E. and Javors, M.  (in press). The cortisol awakening response predicts subclinical depressive symptomatology in Mexican Americans. J Psychiatric Research (in press).
    • Mangold, D. L., Mintz, J., Javors, M. & Marino, E. (in press). Neuroticism, acculturative stress, and the cortisol awakening response in Mexican Americans. Hormones and Behavior. 
    • Mangold, D.L. (under review).  Subclinical depressive symptomatology predicts inflammation in Mexican Americans.
    • Mangold, D.L. (under review).  Acculturative stress predicts inflammation in Mexican Americans.

    Published Proceedings

    • McCaul, M. E., Pickens, D. S. & Mangold, D. L. (1991, August).  Counselor-targeted interventions: Effects on client participation in drug treatment.  Proceedings of the Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association, San Francisco, CA  Pharmacology, Biochemistry and Behavior, 39, 24.
    • Ilgin, N., Eldeiry, S., Mangold, D. L., Dannals, H. T., Raver, W. B., Mathews, J. L., Musachio, J. L., McCaul, M., Wand, G. S. & Frost, J. J. (1997, June).  Measurement of brain mu opioid receptor binding in alcohol dependence by PET.  Proceedings of the 44th Annual Meeting for the Society of Nuclear Medicine, San Antonio, TX.  Journal of Nuclear Medicine, 12, (5) 115-116.
    • Mangold, D. L., Gigey, P., & Wand, G. S. (1998, May).  Enhanced sensitivity to opioid receptor blockade is associated with a family history of alcoholism.  Proceedings of the 21rst Annual Scientific Meeting of the Research Society on Alcoholism, Hilton Head, NC.  Alcoholism Clin Exp Res (suppl) 22 (3), 29a.
    • Mangold, D. L., Meyers, L., Ali, M., Gigey, P., Gotjen, D., Getz, K, & Wand G. S. (1999, May).  Opioid receptor blockade modulates type II behavioral symptomology in high risk, non-alcoholics.  Proceedings of the 22rst Annual Scientific Meeting of the Research Society on Alcoholism, Santa Barbara, CA.  Alcoholism Clin Exp Res (suppl) 23 (5), 38a.
    • Mangold, D. L., Getz, K., Gotjen, D., Hernandez-Avila, C., Kranzler, H., Myers, L. & Wand, G. S. (1999, May).  The effects of oral contraceptives on cortisol responses to naloxone in high risk women.  Proceedings of the 22nd  Annual Scientific Meeting of the Research  Society on Alcoholism.  Santa Barbara, CA.  Alcoholism Clin Exp Res, (suppl) 23 (5), 38a.
    • Bencherif, B., Ilgin, N., Wand, G. S., Eldeiry, S., Mangold, D. L., Musachio, J.L., Rafvert, H. T., Mathews, W. B., Dannals, R. F. & Frost, J. J. (1999, June).  Statistical parametric mapping of brain opioid receptor binding changes in chronic alcoholics.  Proceedings of the 46th Annual Meeting for the Society of Nuclear Medicine, Los Angeles, CA.  Journal of Nuclear Medicine, 40, (5) 110-111.
    • Mangold, D. L., Kalechstein, A., & Newton, T.  (2001, June).  A meta-analyses: Neuropsychological deficits associated with methamphetamine dependence.  Proceedings of the Annual Scientific Meeting of the College of Problems on Drug Dependence, Scottsdale, Arizona.
  • Selected Honors

    • Research Capacity Training Fellowship Award, Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities
    • Shared Resource Scholar, Shared Resource Core, School of Nursing, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
    • Research Development Award ($3,000), Office of Research Development, University of Texas at San Antonio.
    • New Faculty Research Award ($5,000), Office of Research Development, University of Texas at San Antonio
    • NICDS Postdoctoral Training Award, Department of Neurobiology, University of California, Los Angeles

    Recent and Current Funding Awards

    • 9/05 - 8/08 Mangold, D.L. (Principal Investigator) R24-MH070636 01A1, NIMH: South Texas Initiative for Mental Health Research, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and Health Problems in Mexican-American Women
    • 8/09 - 8/11  Mangold, D.L. (Principal Investigator), San Antonio Life Sciences Institute, Infrastructure Grant.
    • 9/08 - 9/11 Mangold, D.L. (Principal Investigator), UTSA Subcontract, U.S. Army Medical Research and Material Command, Office of the Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs. Longitudinal Examination of the Effects of Neuroticism on Pre- versus Post-Deployment Changes in Hypothalamic Pituitary-Adrenal Axis reactivity, inflammation and Health

    Invited Presentations:

    • Mangold & Wand, G.S. (November, 2008). Neuroticism and morning salivary cortisol levels predict proinflammatory response in Mexican-Americans.   Presented at: A Brain Research Meeting: Stress, Coping and Disease, Arlington, VA.

    Affiliations

    • Neuroscience Institute
    • Association for Psychological Science
    • Society for Biological Psychiatry
    • Southwestern Psychological Association
    • American Psychological Association

    Ad-hoc reviewing

    • Hormones and Behavior
    • Psychoneuroendocrinology
    • Biological Psychology
    • Journal of Psychosomatic Research
    • Biological Psychiatry
    • Journal Psychiatric Research

Michelle Little, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor
Department of Psychology

Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Phone: (210) 458-6056
Office: MH 04.02.16
Office hours: T 4:00-5:00 pm & TH 1:00-2:00 pm & by appt

Research area: Developmental Psychology, Adolescence

About
Teaching
Research
Publications
Additional Information
  • Degrees

    • Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology, 2006, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA 
    • MA in Clinical Psychology, 2001, University of Delaware, Newark, DE
    • B.A. Yale University, 1990, New Haven, CT         
  • Recent Courses

    • 2503 Developmental Psychology
    • 3513 Developmental Psychopathology
    • 4133 Social & Personality Development
    • 5303 Developmental Psychology (MS level)
    • 7003 Multivariate Statistical Analysis (PhD level)
  • Research in Progress

    • Prevention of young adult externalizing disorder; gender differences in relational pre-cursors of antisocial behavior
    • Impact of incarceration on juvenile offenders’ social adaptation
  • Recent Publications

    • Little, M. (in press). Do affiliative and autonomous styles relate to peer relational victimization and aggression? Journal of Aggression, Maltreatment and Trauma, 2013. 
    • Little, M. & Seay, D.* (in press). By-gender risk paths of parental psychological control effects on emerging adult overt and relational aggression. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships,2013. 
    • Pina, A. Little, M., Wynne, H., & Beidel, D. (2013). Assessing social anxiety in African-American youth using the Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory for Children. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology.
    • Terlecki, M., Newcombe, N.S., & Little, M. (2011). Reprint of ‘Durable and generalized effects of long-term mental rotation practice and videogame training’. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 25, S253-  S271. Nominated by Robert F. Belli for inclusion in the 25th Anniversary Edition of Applied Cognitive Psychology, Advance online publication, 1-10. 
    • Little, M., Sandler, I.N., Wolchik, S.A., Tein, J.-Y., & Ayers, T.S. (2009). An examination of  cognitive, relational and stress mechanisms underlying gender differences in recovery from internalizing problems following the death of a parent. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, 38, 486-500.
    • Little, M., Dipaola-Handley, E.*, Leuthe, E.* & Chassin, L. (2009). The impact of parenthood on alcohol use trajectories: Variations as a function of timing of parenthood, familial alcoholism and gender. Development and Psychopathology, 21, 661–682. 
    • Mauricio, A.M., Little, M., Chassin, L., Knight, G.P., Losoya, S.H., Piquero, A., & Vargas-Chanes, D. (2009). Juvenile offenders’ alcohol and marijuana trajectories: Risk and protective factor effects in the context of supervised time. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 38, 440–453.
    • Pina, A. A., Little, M., Knight, G.P. & Silverman, W.K. (2009) Cross-ethnic measurement equivalence of the RCMAS in Latino and White youth with anxiety disorders. Journal of Personality Assessment, 91: 58-61.
    • Little, M., Weaver, S., King, K.M.*, Liu, F.* & Chassin, L. (2008). Historical change in the link between adolescent deviance proneness and marijuana use, 1979-2004. Prevention Science, 9, 4-16.
    • Little, M., & Steinberg, L. (2006). Psychosocial correlates of adolescent drug dealing in the inner-city: Potential roles of opportunity, conventional commitments and maturity. Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency, 43, 357-386.
  • PSYCHOLOGY DEPARTMENT SERVICE

    2013               Merit Committee Member
    2012-2013       Member, Doctoral Admissions Committee
    2011-2013       Junior Faculty Hiring Committee
    2009-2011       Chair of Speaker Series Committee
    2009-2010       Graduate Admissions Committee Member
    2010               Merit Committee Member
    2010-2011       Faculty Picnic Committee Member


    SERVICE TO THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL AND FINE ARTS

    2011-2013       Member, COLFA Research and Creative Activities Committee
    Fall 2012          Faculty Representative  at “Rowdy Days” Student Orientation
    2008 – 2011    Library Liaison
    2010- present  Affirmative Action Advocate Representative


    SERVICE TO THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT SAN ANTONIO

    Fall 2012          Member, University Standing Committee, the Committee on Committees
    2010-2011       Speaker Series Committee

    PROFESSIONAL SERVICE

    2006-2013       Reviewer 

    • Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology
    • Ad Hoc Review
    • Addiction
    • Health Education Research
    • Journal of Affective Disorders
    • Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology
    • Journal of Nicotine and Tobacco Research
    • Journal of Personal and Social Relationships
    • Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment
    • Journal of Quantitative Criminology
    • Journal of Studies in Alcohol and Drugs  
    • Journal of Youth and Adolescence
    • Justice Quarterly
    • Psychology of Women Quarterly
    • Social Science and Medicine
    • Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology
    • Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention and Policy
    •  Violence and Victims

    2012            Society for Research in Child Development, Conference Submission Reviewer
    2010            Society for Research in Child Development, Conference Submission Reviewer
    2009            Society for Research on Adolescence, Conference Submission Reviewer

    PROFESSIONAL MEMBERSHIPS

    • American Psychological Association, 2001-2003, 2004-2009
    • American Psychological Society, 2002 – 2004, 2008-2009
    • Society for Prevention Research, 2006-2009
    • Society for Research in Adolescence, 2002 – 2004, 2006-2008
    • Society for Research in Child Development, 2001 - 2013

R. Reed Hunt, Ph.D.

Professor
Department of Psychology

Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Phone: (210) 458-6642
Office: MH 04.02.26

Research area: Cognitive Psychology

About
Teaching
Research
Publications
Additional Information
  • Degrees

    • Ph.D. in Psychology, University of New Mexico
    • M.A. in Psychology, Wake Forest University
    • B.A. in Psychology, College of William and Mary
  • Recent Courses

     

    • 4143  Memory
    • 7133  Adv Topics: Applied Cognitive Psychology (PhD level)
  • Research in Progress

    • Development and application of a theory of distinctive processing in memory (e.g., Hunt, 2003).
    • Error correction in memory using a variety of test environments and the effect of feedback on both propagation of correct responses and on the correction of errors in those test environments.
    • Evaluating theories of implicit memory and priming on their ability to predict priming for very low frequency category instances.

     

  • Recent Publications

    • Smith, R. E., & Hunt, R. R. (in press). Prospective memory in young and older adults: The effect of task importance and ongoing task load. Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition.
    • Hunt, R. R. (2013). Precision in memory through distinctive processing. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 22, 10-15.
    • Hunt, R. R. (2012). Distinctive processing: The coaction of similarity and difference in memory. In B. H. Ross (Ed.), Learning and Motivation, v. 52, pp. 1-46. New York: Academic Press.
    • Hunt, R. R. & Rawson, K. A. (2011). Knowledge affords distinctive processing in memory. Journal of Memory and Language, 65, 390-405.
    • Hunt, R. R., Smith, R. E., & Dunlap, K. R. (2011). How does distinctive processing reduce false recall? Journal of Memory and Language, 65, 378-389.
    • Worthen, J.B., & Hunt, R.R. (2011). Mnemonology: Mnemonics for the 21st century. New York: Psychology Press.
    • Kane, M.J., Core, T.J, & Hunt, R.R. (2010). Bias versus bias: Harnessing hindsight to reveal paranormal belief change, beyond demand characteristics. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 17, 206-212.
    • Hunt, R. R. (2009). Does salience facilitate longer term retention? Memory, 17, 49-53.
    • Smith, R. E., Hunt, R.R., & Gallagher, M. P. (2008). The effect of study modality on false recognition. Memory & Cognition, 36, 1439-1449.
    • McConnell, M. M. & Hunt, R. R. (2007). Can False Memories Be Corrected by Feedback in the DRM Paradigm? Memory & Cognition, 35, 999-1006.
    • Smith , R. E., Hunt, R. R., McVay, J.C., & McConnell, M. D. (2007). Salience and prospective memory. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 33, 734-746.
    • Hunt, R. R. & Lamb, C. A. (2006). What does it take to implicitly prime low frequency category exemplars? Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory and Cognition, 32, 249-258.
    • Hunt, R. R., & Worthen, J. B. (Eds.) (2006). Distinctiveness and memory. New York: Oxford University Press.
    • Van Overschelde, J. P., Rawson, K. A., Dunlosky, J. & Hunt, R. R. (2005). Distinctive processing underlies skilled memory. Psychological Science, 16, 358-361.
  • Memberships

    • Psychonomic Society
    • American Psychological Association
    • Southeastern Psychological Association
    • Eastern Psychological Association
    • Southern Society for Philosophy and Psychology
    • Association for Psychological Science
    • Midwestern Psychological Association
    • Southwestern Psychological Association

    Associate Editor

    • Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 2009-present
    • Memory, 2008- present

    Consulting Editor

    • Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning,Memory, and Cognition-1987-1990;1995-2000; 2006-2008
    • The American Journal of Psychology - 1986-1989
    • Journal of Experimental Child Psychology - 1988-92

    Selected Funding and Honors:

    • 2004-2006 False Memories Following Visual or Auditory Learning -NIH R15 MH067582- Principal Investigator.
    • Fellow of the American Psychology Association, Divisions 1 & 3
    • Fellow of the Association for Psychological Science
    • Member, Board of Governors of the Psychonomic Society (2008-2013)
    • Chair, Board of Governors of the Psychonomic Society (2011)

    Hunt Laboratory

Raymond Garza, Ph.D.

Professor
Department of Psychology

Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Phone: (210) 458-4081
Office: MH 4.03.12
Office hours: W 1:00-3:00 pm & by appt

Research area: Research Methods, Chicano Studies, Personality Theory, Social Psychology, Intergroup relations, Hispanic social processes, and minority mental health

About
Teaching
Research
Publications
Additional Information
  • Biography

    Dr. Raymond T. Garza received his BA and MA in Psychology from Texas A&M University at Kingsville and his PhD in Social Psychology from Purdue University. His research and scholarly publications include significant contributions in the areas of cross-cultural psychology, minority mental health, Hispanic social processes, intergroup relations, leadership and organizational behavior. Dr. Garza’s research and professional programs have been supported by major grants from federal agencies and private foundations totaling more than 20 million Dollars. Currently, he is Principal Investigator of a multi-site grant supported by the American Legacy Foundation, which explores the relationship between smoking behavior and attitudes, self-esteem, depression, cultural identification, self-monitoring, and acculturation among college students from various Hispanic subgroups. Recently, Dr. Garza was the Principal Investigator on two major research infrastructure development grants funded by NIMH and AHRQ. Before coming to UTSA in 1991, Dr. Garza held a faculty appointment with the University of California, Riverside where he co-authored extensively with doctoral students and chaired 14 doctoral dissertation committees. Dr. Garza has also held several top administrative positions over the past 35 years, including Provost at UTSA.

    Degrees

    • Ph.D. in Psychology, Purdue University
    • M.A. in Psychology, Texas A&M University, Kingsville
    • B.A. in Psychology, Texas A&M University, Kingsville
  • Recent Courses

    • 3053  Cross-Cultural Psychology
    • 4003  History of Psychology
    • 5393  Cross-Cultural Psychology (MS level)
    • 7143  Diversity & Health Disparities (PhD level)
    • 7203  Grant Development (PhD level)

     

  • Research in Progress

  • Recent Publications

    • Mangold, D. L., Meuth, K., Garza, R. T., and Newton, L. (2013). Generational Status Moderates the Effects of Extraversion on the Cortisol Awakening Response in Mexican American Adults,. Annals of Behavioral Medicine.
    • Gonzalez-Blanks, A., Lopez, S.G., and Garza, R.T. (2012). Collectivism in smoking prevention programs for Hispanic preadolescents: Raising the ante on cultural sensitivity. Journal of Child and Adolescent Substance Abuse, 21, 427-439. Doi: 10.1080/1067828X.2012.724283
    • Lopez, S.G., Garza, R.T., & Gonzalez-Blanks, A. (2012). Preventing smoking among Hispanic preadolescents: Program orientation, participant individualism-collectivism, and acculturation level. Hispanic Journal of the Behavioral Sciences,, 34, 323-339.
    • Villagran, M., Wittenberg-Lyles, E. M., & Garza, R. T. (2006). A problematic integration approach to Capturing the cognitive, cultural, and communicative experiences of Hurricane Katrina volunteers. Analysis of Social Issues and Public Policy, 6(1).
    • Firestone, J. M., Garza, R. T., and Harris, R. J. (2005). Protestant work ethic and worker productivity in a Mexican brewery. International Sociology, 20(1). 27-44.
    • Garza, R. T. (2000). What managers need to know about ethnicity: Hispanics as leaders of Anglo, Hispanic, or ethnically-mixed work groups. Proceedings of the Forty-second Annual Meeting of the Southwest Academy of Management (referred). Year 2000 Volume, pp. 135-139.


    RESEARCH UNDER REVIEW, IN PREPARATION, OR IN PROGRESS

    • Chance, W.E. & Garza, R. Instructing Task-Groups: How Ethnic Social Identities can Influence Task Performance and Group-Leader Perceptions.
    • Gonzalez-Blanks, A., Lopez, S.G., & Garza, R.T. Collectivism in smoking prevention programs for Hispanic preadolescents: Raising the ante on cultural sensitivity.
    • Lopez, S.G., Garza, R.T., & Gonzalez-Blanks, A. “Mejoremos nuestra salud comiendo saludable”: Blending Science and Culture in Promoting Healthy Nutrition among Hispanic Preadolescents
    • Vasquez, J., Garza, R.T., and Pillow, D. An Ecological Approach to Mental Health in Urban Hispanics
    • Vasquez, J., Pillow, D, and Garza R.T. Neighborhood Factors and Mental Health: Small Life Events as a Moderator
    • Lopez, S., Garza, R., Moring, J., & Gonzalez-Blanks, A. Enhancing healthy attitudes and behaviors about nutrition in Hispanic youth.
    • Lopez, S., Garza, R., Moring, J., & Gonzalez-Blanks, A. The influence of Hispanic parents’ attitudes and behaviors toward eating on Hispanic children.
    • Garza, R. T. and Chance W. E. Leadership, diversity, and motivation: Influence of group identities on Intergroup attitudes and individual performance.
    • Trofimoff, V. and Garza, R. T. Looking out for number one: Personal self-esteem, collective self-esteem and social comparison choices following a threat to social identity.
    • Borchert, J. E. and Garza, R. T. Social Identity Theory versus socialization: Sex, gender, and positive social identity.
  • Professional Service


    UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA (partial list):

    • Academic Personnel Review Committees
    • Faculty Charges Committee (Academic Senate)
    • Privilege and Tenure Committee
    • Administrative Search Committees
    • College Executive Committee (Academic Senate)
    • Committee on Intramural Research Support
    • Graduate Opportunity Fellowship Committee
    • Graduate Affirmative Action Task Force (UC-wide)
    • Faculty Committee on Affirmative Action (UC-wide)
    • Presidents' Fellowship Advisory Committee (UC-wide)

    UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS (partial list):

    • Linguistic Minorities Project Advisory Committee (UC-wide)
    • Faculty Governance Development Committee
    • Faculty Research Awards Committee (Chair)
    • Council on Graduate Education (Chair)
    • Academic Administrative Council (Chair)
    • Various Faculty and Administrative Search Committees
    • Council of Public University Chief Academic Officers (statewide)
    • Instruction Formula Study Committee Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board

    NATIONAL (partial list):

    • Advisory Committee, Hispanic Theological Initiative, Princeton, NJ
    • Ford Foundation Post-Doctoral Fellowships Program, Washington, DC
    • Behavioral Sciences Evaluation Panel, National Research Council Washington, DC
    • Hispanic Faculty Liaison, United States Department of Education
    • Minority Biomedical Research Support Program Review Panel National Institute of Health,
    • Washington, DC
    • Ford Foundation Pre-Doctoral Fellowships Program, Washington, DC
    • Multi-Campus Working Group on Faculty Roles and Rewards at Metropolitan Universities
    • Committee on Access and Diversity, Council on Academic Affairs, NASULGC
    • Western Association of Schools and Colleges (1999, 2002, 2007) 

    COMMUNITY (partial list):

    • Board of Directors, Community Settlement Association Riverside, California
    • Charter Member & Former President, Health Alliance of the Inland Counties
    • San Bernardino, California
    • Charter Member, Concilio for the Spanish Speaking of Riverside
    • Board of Directors, Health Systems Agency, Riverside, California
    • Panel of Judges, JC Penny Golden Rule Awards Program
    • Board of Directors, Guadeloupe Cultural Arts Center, San Antonio, Texas

    CONSULTANT APPOINTMENTS (Partial List)

    • National Institute of Education Washington, DC
    • Administration for Children, Youth and Families Washington, DC
    • Spanish Speaking Mental Health Research Center, UCLA
    • Office of Naval Research Arlington, Virginia
    • National Research Council, Washington, DC
    • National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC
    • General Mills Foundation, Minneapolis, Minnesota
    • Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities, San Antonio, TX

    PROFESSIONAL ASSOCIATION MEMBERSHIPS (past and present)

    • Society for Experimental Social Psychology
    • Southwestern Psychological Association
    • American Psychological Association
    • Western Psychological Association
    • Society for Research in Child Development
    • Society for Personality Assessment
    • National Chicano Council on Higher Education
    • Council of Graduate Schools in the United States

    EDITORIAL APPOINTMENTS

    • Editorial Board, Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences
    • Reviewer, American Psychologist
    • Reviewer, Journal of Applied Social Psychology
    • Reviewer, Social Science Journal
    • Reviewer, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
    • Reviewer, Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
    • Reviewer, Journal of Social Behavior and Personality
    • Reviewer, Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology
    • Reviewer, Academy of Management Journal

     

    Latino Health Research Initiative Coordinator

Ephrem Fernandez, Ph.D.

Professor
Department of Psychology

Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Phone: (210) 458-5755
Office: MH 4.01.44

Research area: Psychosomatics; Pain and Suffering; Emotions; Assessment and Regulation of anger

About
Teaching
Research
Publications
Additional Information
  • Biography

    I have two main areas of scholarly interest. The first is medical psychology or what is often called health psychology. The second is the science of affect.

    Within medical psychology, my publications have focused on pain, a universal phenomenon, now regarded by some clinicians as a fifth vital sign, and always a challenge for scholars of the mind. One path of enquiry I have pursued is the language of pain and the clues it holds for underlying pathophysiology and diagnoses of pain syndromes; Funded by a grant from the National Institutes of Health, this research has led to the validation of a new Pain Descriptor System, aspects of which have been published in The Journal of Pain.

    Both in research and teaching, I view a variety of medical ailments as influenced by basic principles of psychosomatics. These go well beyond mere conjunction of psyche and soma to what I call "dynamic interactions" between physical symptoms and affective phenomena such as anxiety, depression, and anger. In the treatment of such conditions, I espouse the use of cognitive-behavioral techniques within a broader interdisciplinary framework for health promotion and disease prevention.

    Within the area of affect science, I have proposed a construct called the core of negative affect that encompasses anxiety, depression, and anger. The third element in this triad has been under-researched and is now a primary focus of my attention. Most of my publications on this topic have tackled the problem of maladaptive anger. My recent work in this area focuses on integrative psychotherapy for dysfunctional anger and the assessment of multiple dimensions of anger apparent in clinical cases as well as in everyday life. A cognitive-motivational model is fundamental to the assessment and regulation of anger, though experiential techniques can also be incorporated as in my forthcoming book Treatments for Anger in Specific Populations: Theory, Application and Outcome (Oxford University Press). This offers a heuristic for the study and treatment of other emotional disorders too.

    These pursuits address important problems and prospects for improvement in the human condition. They won't bring us immortality or nirvana but they are likely to make us healthier and happier

    Degrees

    • Internship, Western Psychiatric Institute & Clinic, University of Pittsburgh Medical School
    • Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology, Ohio State University
    • M.A. in Experimental Psychology, Miami University
    • B.A. (Honors), University of Western Australia 
  • Recent Courses

    University of Texas at San Antonio (2006-Present)

    • 2513 Abnormal Psychology
    • 3543  Introduction to Clinical Psychology
    • 4253  Psychology of Health
    • 5113  Professional Ethics & Standards (Master's level course)
    • 5313 Seminar in Psychopathology (Master's level course)
    • 5363 Seminar in Health Psychology (Master's level course)

    Southern Methodist University (1993-2006)

    • 3380 Health Psychology
    • 5356 Introduction to Clinical Psychology (Master's level course)
    • 5362/5387 Emotions: Psychological & Interdisciplinary Perspectives (Master's level course)
    • 5383 Behavorial Medicine Techniques (Master's level course)
    • 6360 Ethics in Psychological Science & Practice (Master's level course)
    • SOSC 6322/BHSC 6322 Mind Body & Health (Master's level course)

    University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center (2002-2005)

    • 5356 Adult Psychopathology (Doctoral level course)
    • Health Psychology (Guest lectures)

    Teaching Evaluations

  • Research in Progress

    • Interaction between physical symptoms and affective qualities (anxiety, depression, anger)
    • Cross-linguistic clues to pain diagnoses
    • Psychometric assessment of anger experience and expression
    • Integrative psychotherapy for maladaptive anger

     

    Fernandez Laboratory

    Phone:  (210) 458-6778
    Web: http://utsa.edu/emotionandsensation

  • Recent Publications

     

    • Fernandez, E. & Kerns, R.D. (in press). New prospects for alleviation of anger in the context of chronic pain. Z. Bajwa, C. Warfield, & J. Wootton (Eds.). Principles and Practice of Pain Medicine, 3rd Edition. New York: McGraw-Hill.
    • Fernandez, E., Arevalo, I., Torralba, A., & Vargas, R. (in press) Norms for five parameters of anger: How do incarcerated adults differ from the community? International Journal of Forensic Mental Health.
    • Fernandez, E., Day, A., & Boyle, G.J. (in press). Measures of anger and hostility in adults. In G.J. Boyle, D. Saklofske & G. Matthews (Eds.). Measures of Personality and Social Psychological Constructs. London: Academic Press.
    • Newton, D., Day, A., Gillies, C. & Fernandez, E. (in press). Evidence-based evaluation of measures for assessing social and emotional wellbeing in Indigenous Australians. Australian Psychologist.
    • Fernandez, E. (2013). Anger dysfunction and its treatment. In E. Fernandez, (Ed.) Treatments for anger in specific populations: Theory, application, and outcome (pp.1-14). New York: Oxford University Press.
    • Fernandez, E. & Malley-Morrison, K. (2013). Gender-inclusive and gender-informed treatment of anger. In E. Fernandez, (Ed.). Treatments for anger in specific populations: Theory, application, and outcome (pp.213-235). New York: Oxford University Press.
    • Fernandez, E. (2013). Treatment of anger in different populations: Common and unique factors. In E. Fernandez, (Ed.). Treatments for anger in specific populations: Theory, application, and outcome (pp.255-265). New York: Oxford University Press.
    • Fernandez, E. & Kerns, R.D. (2012). Pain and affective disorders: Looking beyond the “chicken and egg” conundrum. In M.A. Giamberardino & T. Jensen (Eds.). Pain Comorbidities: Understanding and Treating the Complex Patient (pp.279-296). Seattle: International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) Press.
    • Fernandez, E. (2012). Defining pain: Natural Semantic Metalanguage meets IASP: A Commentary on Wierzbicka’s “Is Pain a Human Universal?: A Cross-Linguistic and Cross-Cultural Perspective on Pain”. Emotion Review, 4, 320-321.
    • Fernandez, E., Vargas, R., Mahometa, M., Ramamurthy, S. & Boyle, G.J. (2012). Descriptors of Pain Sensation: A Dual Hierarchical Model of Latent Structure. The Journal of Pain, 13, 532-536.
    • Fernandez, E., Krusz, J.C., & Hall, S. (2011). Parsimonious collection of pain descriptors: Classification and calibration by pain patients. The Journal of Pain, 12, 444-450.
    • Fernandez, E. & Wasan, A. (2010). The anger of pain sufferers: Attributions to agents and appraisals of wrongdoing. In M. Potegal, G. Stemmler, & C. Spielberger (Eds.). The International Handbook of Anger: Constituent and Concomitant Biological, Psychological, and Social Processes (pp. 449-464). New York: Springer.
    • Fernandez, E. (2010). Toward an integrative psychotherapy for maladaptive anger. In M. Potegal, G. Stemmler, & C. Spielberger (Eds.). The International Handbook of Anger: Constituent and Concomitant Biological, Psychological, and Social Processes (pp.499-514). New York: Springer.
    • Fernandez, E., & Scott, S. (2009). Anger treatment in chemically-dependent inpatients: Evaluation of phase effects and gender. Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy, 37, 431-447.
    • Fernandez, E. & Kerns, R.D. (2008). Anxiety, depression, and anger: The core of negative affect in medical populations. In G. J Boyle, D. Matthews & D. Saklofske (Eds.). International Handbook of Personality Theory and Testing: Vol. 1: Personality Theories and Models (pp. 659-676). London: Sage Publications.
    • Fernandez, E. (2008). The angry personality: A representation on six dimensions of anger expression. In G. J Boyle, D. Matthews & D. Saklofske (Eds.). International Handbook of Personality Theory and Testing: Vol. 2: Personality Measurement and Assessment (pp.402-419). London: Sage Publications.
    • Wasan, A., Fernandez, E., Jamison, R.N., & Bhattacharya, N. (2007). Association of anxiety and depression with reported disease severity in patients undergoing evaluation for chronic rhinosinusitis. Annals of Otology, Rhinology, and Laryngology, 116, 491-497.
    • Boyle, G.J., Fernandez, E., & Ortet, G (2003). El cuestionario de dolor de McGill (McGill Pain Questionnaire--MPQ): consideraciones lingüísticas y estadísticas. Revista de Psicologia de la Universidad de Chile, 12, 111-119.
    • Fernandez, E. (2003). Anger regulation in adolescence. In T. Gullotta & M. Bloom (Eds.) Encyclopedia of Primary Prevention and Health Promotion (pp. 195-199). New York: Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers.
    • Fernandez, E. (2003). Anger regulation in childhood. In T. Gullotta & M. Bloom (Eds.) Encyclopedia of Primary Prevention and Health Promotion (pp.190-195). New York: Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers.
    • Boyle, G.J., Goldman, R., Svoboda, J.S., & Fernandez, E. (2002). Male circumcision: Pain, trauma, and psychosexual sequelae. Journal of Health Psychology, 7, 329-343. [Reprinted in G.J. Boyle & D.H. Saklofske (2003) Psychology of Individual Differences. London: Sage Publications]
    • Cipher, D.J., Fernandez, E., & Clifford, P.A. (2002). Coping style influences compliance with multidisciplinary pain management. Journal of Health Psychology, 7, 665-673.
    • Fernandez, E., & Boyle, G.J. (2002). Affective and evaluative descriptors of pain in the McGill Pain Questionnaire: Reduction and reorganization. The Journal of Pain, 3, 70-77. [Reprinted in G.J. Boyle & D.H. Saklofske (2003) Psychology of Individual Differences. London: Sage Publications]
    • Cipher, D.J., Fernandez, E., & Clifford, P.A. (2001). Cost effectiveness and health care utilization in a multidisciplinary pain center: Comparison of three treatment groups. Journal of Clinical Psychology in Medical Settings, 8, 237-244.
    • Fernandez, E., & Beck, R. (2001). Cognitive-behavioral self-intervention versus self- monitoring of anger: Effects on anger frequency, duration, and intensity. Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy, 29, 345-356.
    • Fernandez, E., Clark, T.S., & Rudick-Davis, D. (1999). A framework for conceptualization and assessment of affective disturbance in pain. In A.R. Block, E.F. Kremer, & E. Fernandez (Eds.), Handbook of Pain Syndromes: Biopsychosocial perspectives (pp. 123-147). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.
    • Beck, R., & Fernandez, E. (1998). Cognitive-behavioral self-regulation of the frequency, duration, and intensity of anger. Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment, 20, 217-229.
    • Beck, R., & Fernandez, E. (1998). Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy in the treatment of anger: A meta-analysis. Cognitive Therapy and Research, 22, 63-74 [Also abstracted in Evidence-Based Mental Health, 1998, Vol. 1, No. 4, p.105].
    • Fernandez, E. (1998). The role of affect in somatoform and factitious disorders. Current Review of Pain, 2, 109-114.
    • Skiffington, S., Fernandez, E., & McFarland, K.A. (1998). Towards the validation of multiple features in the assessment of emotions. European Journal of Psychological Assessment, 14, 202-210.
    • Cipher, D.J., & Fernandez, E. (1997). Expectancy variables predicting the tolerance and avoidance of pain in chronic pain patients. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 35, 437-444.
    • Turk, D.C., & Fernandez, E. (1997). Cognitive-behavioral management strategies for pain and suffering. Current Review of Pain, 1, 99-106 [Also abstracted in Current Pain and Headache Reports, Vol. 1, No.2]
    • Fernandez, E., & Boyle, G.J. (1996). Meta-analytic procedure and interpretation of treatment outcome and test validity for the practitioner psychologist. In M. Smith & V. Sutherland. International Review of Professional Issues in Selection and Assessment (pp. 109-125). Chichester, UK: John Wiley & Sons.
    • Fernandez, E., & Sheffield, J. (1996). Relative contributions of life events versus daily hassles to the frequency and intensity of headaches. Headache, 36, 595-602.
    • Fernandez, E., & Sheffield, J. (1996). Descriptive features and causal attributions of headache in an Australian community sample. Headache, 36, 246-250.
    • Fernandez, E., & Towery, S. (1996). A parsimonious set of verbal descriptors of pain sensation derived from the McGill Pain Questionnaire. Pain, 66, 31-37.
    • Towery, S., & Fernandez, E. (1996). Reclassification and rescaling of McGill Pain Questionnaire verbal descriptors of pain sensation: A replication. The Clinical Journal of Pain, 12, 270-276.
    • Fernandez, E., & McDowell, J.J. (1995). Response-reinforcement relationships in chronic pain syndrome: Applicability of Herrnstein's hyperbola. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 33, 855-863.
    • Fernandez, E., & Sheffield, J. (1995). Psychosocial stressors predicting headache occurrence: The major role of minor hassles. Invited paper. Headache Quarterly: Current Treatment and Research, 6, 215-220.
    • Fernandez, E., & Turk, D.C. (1995). The scope and significance of anger in the experience of chronic pain, Pain, 61, 165-175.
    • Turk, D.C., & Fernandez, E. (1995). Personality assessment and the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory in chronic pain. The Pain Forum, 4, 104-107.
    • Fernandez, E., & Milburn, T.E. (1994). Sensory and affective predictors of overall pain, and emotions associated with affective pain, The Clinical Journal of Pain, 10, 3-9. [Also published as abstract in Multidisciplinary Pain Abstracts, 1994, 4, issue 4, p.325].
    • Fernandez, E., & Turk, D.C. (1994). Demand characteristics underlying differential ratings of sensory versus affective components of pain, Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 17, 375-390.
    • Fernandez, E., & Llamas, M. (1993). EMG alone and in combination with posture feedback: A comparative treatment study in a case of torticollis. Behaviour Change, 10, 32-38.
    • Fernandez, E., & Turk, D.C. (1993). Anger in chronic pain patients: A neglected target of attention. American Pain Society Bulletin, 3 (4), 5-7.
    • Fernandez, E., Semple, C., Lakshminarasimhan, V., & McDowell, J.J. (1992). A "C" program to fit Herrnstein's hyperbola using Wilkinson's method. Behavior Research Methods, Instruments, & Computers, 24, 581.
    • Fernandez, E., & Turk, D. C. (1992). Sensory and affective components of pain: Separation and synthesis. Psychological Bulletin, 112, 205-217. [Reprinted in G.J. Boyle & D.H. Saklofske (2003) Psychology of Individual Differences. London: Sage Publications]
    • Fernandez, E., Nygren, T. E., & Thorn, B. E. (1991). An open-transformed scale for correcting ceiling effects and enhancing retest reliability: The example of pain. Perception and Psychophysics, 49, 572-578.
    • Turk, D. C. & Fernandez, E. (1991). Pain and cancer: A cognitive-behavioral perspective. In M. Watson (Ed.), Cancer patient care: Psychosocial treatment methods (pp. 15-44). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    • Fernandez, E. (1990). Artifact in pain ratings, its implications for test-retest reliability, and correction by a new scaling procedure. Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment, 12, 1-15.
    • Turk, D. C. & Fernandez, E. (1990). On the putative uniqueness of cancer pain: Do psychological principles apply? Behaviour Research and Therapy, 28, 1-13. [Also published as abstract in Psychiatry/Neurology Digest, 1992, and reprinted in S. Rachman (Ed.) (1997) Best of behaviour research and therapy (pp.157-169). New York: Pergamon/Elsevier Science Inc.].
    • Fernandez, E., & Turk, D. C. (1989). The utility of cognitive coping strategies for altering pain perception: A meta-analysis. Pain, 38, 123-135. [Also published as abstract in Behavioral Medicine Abstracts]
    • Fernandez, E. (1986). A classification system of cognitive coping strategies for pain. Pain, 26, 141-151

    Books

    • Fernandez, E. (Ed.) (2013). Treatments for Anger in Specific Populations: Theory, Application, and Outcome. New York: Oxford University Press.
    • Fernandez, E. (2002). Anxiety, Depression, and Anger in Pain: Research Findings and Clinical Options. Dallas, TX: Advanced Psychological Resources, Inc. [Reviewed in American Pain Society Bulletin, 2003, July/August p.15; Journal of Health Psychology, 2003, 8 (4), 477-478; Clinical Journal of Pain, 2005, 21, 458-459]
    • Block, A.R., Kremer, E.F., & Fernandez, E. (Eds.), (1999). Handbook of Pain Syndromes: Biopsychosocial Perspectives. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.
  • Visiting Faculty Appointments

    • Spring 2014:  Visiting Scholar, Institute of Personality & Social Research, University of California, Berkeley
    • Fall 2009:  Visiting Scholar, Dept. of Linguistics, University of California, Berkeley & International Computer Science Institute, Berkeley, California
    • Fall 2000:  Visiting Scholar, University of Washington, Seattle, School of Medicine

    Academic & Professional Memberships

    • Association for Psychological Science
    • International Association for the Study of Pain
    • International Society for Research on Emotions

    Select Awards

    • 2005: SMU Rotunda Outstanding Professor Award
    • 2004: SMU Psychology Dept. Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching
    • 2002, 2003, 2004: HOPE (Honoring Our Professors’ Excellence) Recognition, SMU
    • 2003: Honorary Faculty Member, Golden Key International Honor Society
    • 2001: Teaching Fellowship, Maguire Center for Ethics & Public Responsibility, SMU

    Select Grants

    • Fernandez, E. (p.i.). Parameters and Expressions of Anger. International Initiatives Grant, UTSA, $2500.
    • Fernandez, E. (principal investigator). “Psychometric properties and diagnostic utility of the Pain Descriptor System”. National Institutes of Health, R21NR009665 grant, $309,278 (direct costs), 2007-2011.
    • Fernandez, E. (principal investigator). "Confirmation and cross-validation of a parsimonious subset of verbal descriptors of pain from the McGill Pain Questionnaire". R. W. Johnson Pharmaceutical Research Institute: $50,000, 1999-2003.
    • Fernandez, E. (principal investigator). "Self-disclosure versus support for pain and suffering". National Institutes of Health: $35,818, 1995-1997.
    • Fernandez, E. (principal investigator). "Psychophysical scaling of menstrual pain and its response to analgesics". Sterling Pharmaceuticals Pty Ltd.: $13,000, 1991-1993

Ann Eisenberg, Ph.D.

Professor and Associate Dean, Honors College
Department of Psychology

Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Phone: (210) 458-4106
Office: MS 4.02.14
Office hours: M 3:00-4:00 pm, T 11:00 am - 12:00 pm & TH 3:00-4:00 pm

Research area: Developmental Psychology

About
Teaching
Research
Publications
Additional Information
  • Biography

    Ann Eisenberg serves as Associate Dean of the Honors College and as Associate Professor of Psychology at the University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA).  Dr. Eisenberg received her B.A. and M.A. in psychology in 1978 from The Johns Hopkins University and her Ph.D. in developmental psychology from the University of California at Berkeley in 1982.  She completed a post-doctoral fellowship at Educational Testing Services (ETS) before joining the faculty at UTSA in 1983.  Dr. Eisenberg became Director of the University Honors Program and the Honors Program for Young Scholars in 1990 and Associate Dean of the Honors College in 2002.

    Dr. Eisenberg has published articles on the influence of gender, culture, and socioeconomic status on family interaction patterns (particularly family conflict).  She has received research grants from the National Institute of Health and Child Development and the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented as well as grants to establish several training programs at UTSA – the UTSA Women and Minority Undergraduate Research Program (Department of Education, 1994-1995), the UTSA Ronald E. McNair Scholar Development Program (Department of Education, 1995-1999), the Career Opportunities in Research (COR) Honors Undergraduate Training Program (National Institute of Mental Health, 2000-2005), and the Michigan Bridge to the Doctorate Program (with Dr. Harold Neighbors of the University of Michigan; National Institutes of Health, 2002-2005).

    At present, Dr. Eisenberg’s research focuses on autobiographical memories, gender, and emotions, primarily among college students.  She is examining cultural differences in the accessibility of personal, emotionally-based memories and testing the hypothesis that accessibility of such memories is associated with values, such as familism and collectivism.  She is also exploring gender differences in proneness to guilt, with an eye toward examining what aspects of women’s socialization are associated with the higher levels of guilt that women report.  She also is conducting research on how parent-child interaction shapes children’s understanding of televised material.

    Degrees

    PhD in Developmental Psychology, University of California-Berkeley

    M.A. in Psychology, Johns Hopkins University

    B.A. in Psychology, Johns Hopkins University

  • Recent Courses

    • 2503  Developmental Psychology
    • 4323  Psychology of Language
    • 5113  Contemp Resch Paradigm in Psych
    • HON 3301  Graduate School Workshop

     

  • Research in Progress

    The influence of gender and ethnicity on the accessibility of personal memories; individualism and collectivism among Mexican American and European American college students: stereotypes and realities; parental expressiveness and children's perceptions of parent's emotions; social constructions of gender through language; verb acquisition in English and Spanish.

  • Recent Publications

    • Hohenstein, J. M., Eisenberg, A., & Naigles, L. (2006). Is he floating across or crossing afloat? Cross-influence of L1 and L2 in Spanish-English bilingual adults. Bilingualism: Language and Cognition, 9, 249-261.
    • Hohenstein, J. L., Naigles, L. R., & Eisenberg, A. R. (2006). Keeping verb acquisition in motion: A comparison of English and Spanish.  In S. Waxman & G. Hall (Eds.), Weaving a Lexicon, (pp. 569-602). Erlbaum.
    • Eisenberg, A. R. (2002).  Maternal teaching talk within families of Mexican descent: Influences of SES and task. Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Science, 24, 207-225.
    • Wenzlaff, R. M., & Eisenberg, A. R. (2001). Mental control after dysphoria: Evidence of a suppressed depressive bias. Behavior Therapy, 32, 27-45.
    • Eisenberg, A. R. (1999). Emotion talk among Mexican American and Anglo American mothers and children from two social classes. Merrill-Palmer Quarterly, 45, 259-277.
    • Wenzlaff, R. M. & Eisenberg, A. R. (1998).  Parental restrictiveness of negative emotions: Sowing the seeds of thought suppression.  Psychological Inquiry, 9, 310-313.
    • Naigles, L. R., Eisenberg, A. R., Kako, E., Highter, M., & McGraw, N. (1998). Speaking of motion: Verb use in English and Spanish. Language and Cognitive Processes, 13, 521-549.
    • Eisenberg, A. R. (1998).  Honors in a diverse metropolitan context: The role of leadership. Metropolitan Universities, 9, 79-88.
    • Eisenberg, A. R. (1996). The conflict talk of mothers and children: Patterns related to culture, SES, and gender of child. Merrill-Palmer Quarterly, 42, 438-458.
  • Honors and Awards

    • UTSA Ambassadors’ Amber Award, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, and 2008
    • UTSA Million Dollar Scholar Award, 1999
    • President’s Distinguished Award for University Service, 1997
    • W.K. Kellogg National Fellow, 1990-1993

    Academic and Professional Activities

    • Associate Dean of the Honors College
    • Director, Career Opportunities in Research (COR) Program
    • Co-Director, UTSA Michigan Bridge to the Doctorate Program

Robert Fuhrman, Ph.D.

Associate Professor and Chair
Department of Psychology

Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Phone: (210) 458-7352
Office: MH 4.04.54
Office hours: By appt

Research area: Social Cognition, Personality, Interpersonal Relationships

About
Teaching
Research
Publications
Additional Information
  • Biography

    Bob Fuhrman received his M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign.  His training was in Social Psychology with additional work in Cognitive Psychology, Personality, and Psychological Measurement.  His graduate research, conducted under the supervision of Bob Wyer and Tom Srull, investigated the cognitive processes and memory structures used when people make social and personality judgments about themselves and other people.   This work touched on issues pertaining to stereotyping and confirmatory search biases and explored the manner in which people organize and use behavior-based episodic events for judgments pertaining to both self and others (cf. Wyer, R.W., Shoben, E.J., Fuhrman, R.W. & Bodenhausen, G.V., 1985; Fuhrman, R.W. & Wyer, R.S., 1988).

    Following his graduate work, Bob served as a postdoctoral fellow at The Ohio State University.  He collaborated with Tom Ostrom, Constantine Sedikides, and Patricia Devine on a series of person memory projects, several of which examined the memory structures and motivational factors involved when people form impressions of others with whom they expect to interact (cf. Devine, P.G., Sedikides, C. & Fuhrman, R.W., 1989; Sedikides, C., Devine, P.G., & Fuhrman, R.W., 1991).   Bob returned to Illinois as a postdoctoral fellow and pursued several projects that investigated the relationship between trait judgments made about the self and the retrieval of specific biographical events (Klein, S., Loftus, J., Trafton, G., & Fuhrman, R.W., 1992).  He also compared the cognitive processes that underlie trait judgments made about the self with those used by friends to make trait judgments about the target person (Fuhrman, R.W. & Funder, D.C., 1995).

    More recently Bob has collaborated with Dorothy Flannagan on a line of research that investigates the cognitive, affective, and normative factors that influence how people regulate their romantic relationships, cross-sex friendships, and same-sex friendships.   To date, this research program has led to the completion of 11 Masters’ thesis projects and the initiation of 4 others (all currently in progress).  Three of the completed projects have been published and 4 are being prepared for journal review (see Bob’s profile page for a list of the relevant publications and conference papers that have been co-authored with students).  The overall pattern of results from these studies indicate that romantic partners play a central role in a person’s self-identity and general emotional well-being, much more so than the contributions made by either cross-sex or same-sex friends.   For example, compared to friends, people have much higher behavior expectations for romantic partners, feel more disappointed when these expectations are not met, feel more anxious about the potential loss of a romantic partner, and act less distant or avoidant with a romantic partner.  Several projects are currently exploring the possibility that these differences may be due to the higher levels of exclusivity and long-term emotional investments that are commonly associated with partners in romantic relationships.  In addition, we are investigating possible differences in how people regulate cross-sex and same-sex friendships when they are not involved in a romantic relationship.  Several of our studies suggest that people have higher expectations of their cross-sex friends and feel more anxious about the potential loss of these relationships when they do not have a romantic partner.   In contrast, regardless of whether or not people have a romantic partner, no differences were found in the generally low expectations and anxiety shown toward partners in same-sex friendships.  

    In a second line of research Bob has investigated the social and cognitive factors that influence the driving decisions and road behavior of people.  One of Bob’s graduate students, Michael Anthony, conducted a thesis project that found that people often have well-established and highly-articulated stereotypes of other people who drive certain types of vehicles.  Minivan drivers, for example, are often assumed to be friendly and cautious whereas sports car drivers are often assumed to be unfriendly and reckless.  Bob and Michael also investigated the use of vehicle stereotypes in traffic situations where people must make quick driving decisions.  Some situations involve alternative yielding patterns as vehicles exit a freeway and merge into traffic on an access road.  Other situations involve alternative patterns of lane merging as drivers encounter lane closures or make unexpected exits from an interior lane of highways.  We found that the nature of the vehicles involved in these situations do, in fact, influence the driving decisions made.  For example, people are more likely to ‘cut-in-front’ of minivans than sports cars or SUVs.  More recently, Jarryd Willis, another graduate student, conducted a follow-up project and found that the stereotypes associated with the different types of vehicles have not changed significantly over the past 10 years. In addition, Erica Schneid, a former undergraduate honors student, found that the exterior colors of a vehicle can enhance or inhibit the use of stereotypes commonly associated with the vehicle.  For example, sports car stereotypes are enhanced when the sports car is painted red but minivan stereotypes are inhibited when the minivan is painted red.  

    Prior to his appointment as department chair, Bob received internal support for his research, including a faculty developmental leave award from the University of Texas at San Antonio.  He has been a reviewer for a number of professional journals, including The American Journal of Psychology, Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Journal of Applied Social Psychology, Journal of Research in Personality, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Social Cognition, the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, Personal relationships, and the Journal of Social Personal Relations.  He is a member of American Psychological Society (APS), Society for Personality & Social Psychology (SPSP), and the Midwestern Psychological Association (MPA).

    Bob’s current teaching interests include Social Psychology, Personality, Social Cognition, Attitudes, Intimate Relationships, Motivation and Emotion, Evolutionary Psychology, Measurement Theory, and Research Design.  He won the Dean’s Outstanding Teaching Award in 1995 from the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences and the Chancellor's Council Outstanding Teaching Award in 1998 from The University of Texas at San Antonio.

    Degrees

    • Ph.D. in Psychology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    • M.A. in Psychology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    • B.A. in Psychology, Saint Louis University
  • Recent Courses

    • 4213  Social Cognition
    • 5323  Individual Differences & Assessment
    • 5333 Social Psychology
    • 6113  Psychological Measurement
  • Research in Progress

    .

  • Recent Publications

    Recent Articles and Chapters ( * denotes student co-author )

    • Fuhrman, R.W., Flannagan, D., & Matamoros, M.* (2009).  Behavior expectations in cross-sex friendships, same-sex friendships, and romantic relationships.  Personal Relationships, 16, 1350-4126.
    • Flannagan, D., Marsh, D.*, & Fuhrman, R.W.  (2005).  Judgments about the hypothetical behaviors of friends and romantic partners.  Journal of Social and Personal Relations, 22, 797-815.
    • Fuhrman, R. W.  (2003). The Social Psychology of Personality.  Chapter in the Encyclopedia of Life Support Systems.  Publication  sponsored by UNESCO as a behavioral science resource for policy makers in international support agencies.
    • Bradley, L.A.*, Flannagan, D., & Fuhrman, R.W. (2001).  Judgment biases and characteristics of friendships of Mexican American and Anglo-American girls and boys.  Journal of Early Adolescence, 21 (4), 405-424.

    Recent Conference Papers ( * denotes student co-author )

    • Willis, J.T.*, Fuhrman, R.W., Prince, J.B.*, & Smith, K.D.*, (May 2010). Comparing attachment patterns in relationships involving primary caregivers, friends, and romantic partners.  Paper presented at the 22nd annual convention of the Association for Psychological Science, Boston.
    • Fuhrman, R.W., Vale, S.*, & Flannagan, D.A. (May, 2010).  Perceived ease of changing partners and friends.  Paper presented at the 2010 annual convention of the Midwestern Psychological Association, Chicago.
    • Fuhrman, R.W., Willis, J.T.*, & Anthony, M. (May, 2010).  Revisiting the traits commonly associated with vehicle stereotypes.  Paper presented at the 2010 annual convention of the Midwestern Psychological Association, Chicago.
    • Fuhrman, R.W., Smith, K.*, Flannagan, D.A., Willis, J.T.* (Jan 2010). Patterns of insecure attachment that distinguish friendships from romantic relationships.  Paper presented at the 2010 annual Social Psychology and Personality Conference, Las Vegas.
    • Vale, S.*, Fuhrman, R.W., & Flannagan, D.A. (May, 2009).  Ideal traits for romantic partners and friends.  Paper presented at the 21st annual convention of the Association for Psychological Science, San Francisco.
    • Smith, K.D. *, Fuhrman, R.W.,  Sanford, L.*, & Whitchurch, M.* (May, 2009).  Comparing attachment across relationship domains:  Measure of attachment for romantic partners, same-sex friends, and opposite-sex friends.  Paper presented at the 21st annual convention of the Association for Psychological Science, San Francisco.
    • Flannagan, D.A., Fuhrman, R.W., & Vaughn, M.* (May, 2009).  Symptoms of Asperger’s Disorder predict friendship quality and expectations for friends.  Paper presented at the 21st annual convention of the Association for Psychological Science, San Francisco.
    • Chance, M.E.*, Flannagan, D.A., & Fuhrman, R.W.  (May, 2009).  Expectations for friends and romantic partners:  Developmental Patterns.  Paper presented at the 21st annual convention of the Association for Psychological Science, San Francisco.
    • Fuhrman, R.W., Flannagan, D.A., Vale, S.*, & Smith, K.* (May, 2008).  Relationship expectations differentially predict later relationship quality.  Paper presented at the 20th annual convention of the Association for Psychological Science, Chicago.
    • Flannagan, D.A., Matamoros, M.*, & Fuhrman, R.W. (May, 2008).  Having a romantic partner moderates expectations for opposite-sex friends.  Paper presented at the 20th annual convention of the Association for Psychological Science, Chicago.
    • Schneid, E.* & Fuhrman, R.W. (May, 2008). Vehicle type and color affect driver trait attributions.  Paper presented at the 20th annual convention of the Association for Psychological Science, Chicago.
    • Moring, J.C.*, & Fuhrman, R.W. (May, 2008). Coping strategies revisited:  A five component approach.  Paper presented at the 20th annual convention of the Association for Psychological Science, Chicago.
  • Honors and Awards

    • Dean’s Outstanding Teaching Award, 1995
    • Chancellor's Council Outstanding Teaching Award, 1998
    • Who's Who Among America's Teachers, 1998

    Department Service 

    • 2011 - Present   Committee Chair, PSY External Program Review Committee, UTSA
    • 2009 - Present   Committee Member, Room Scheduling Committee, UTSA - Psychology
    • 2003 - Present   Committee Chair, Department Chair, UTSA
    • 2002 - Present   Committee Chair, Psychology PhD Proposal Committee, UTSA - Psychology
    • 2001 - Present   Committee Chair, Psychology Faculty - Student Picnic Committee, UTSA - Psychology


    College Service

    • 2003 - Present   Committee Member, Advisory Council, UTSA - COLFA
    • 2003 - Present   Committee Member, Social Science Committee, UTSA - COLFA


    University Service 

    • 2009 - Present   Member, University Classroom & Space Scheduling Committee, UTSA
    • 2003 - Present   Chair, Department of Psychology, UTSA


    Professional Service

    • 1986 - Present   Member, American Psychological Society (APS)
    • 1986 - Present   Reviewer, Journal Article, Journal of Applied Social Psychology
    • 1986 - Present   Reviewer, Journal Article, Journal of Experimental Social Psychology
    • 1986 - Present   Reviewer, Journal Article, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
    • 1986 - Present   Reviewer, Journal Article, Journal of Research in Personality
    • 1986 - Present   Member, Midwestern Psychological Association (MPA)
    • 1986 - Present   Reviewer, Journal Article, Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
    • 1986 - Present   Reviewer, Journal Article, Social Cognition
    • 1986 - Present   Member, Society for Personality & Social Psychology (SPSP)
    • 1986 - Present   Reviewer, Journal Article, The American Journal of Psychology


    Professional Memberships

    • 1986 - Present   American Psychological Society
    • 1986 - Present   Midwestern Psychological Association
    • 1986 - Present   Society for Personality & Social Psychology

Stella Lopez, Ph.D.

Associate Professor
Department of Psychology

Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Phone: (210) 458-5731
Office: MH 4.04.22
Office hours: W 9:00-10:00 am & TH 2:30-3:00 pm (Jan 16-Apr 30)

Research area: Social and Personality Psychology

About
Teaching
Additional Information
  • Biography

    Stella Lopez received her B.A. in Psychology and Sociology in 1985 at Southern Methodist University and her Ph.D. in Social and Personality Experimental Psychology in 1992 at the University of Texas at Arlington.  She taught at North Dakota State University before arriving at UTSA.  Her current research interests are in social perception (i.e., physical appearance, physical attractiveness, prejudice, stereotyping), social relationships, online, dyadic social interactions, and minority behavioral health. 

    Degrees

    • Doctor of Philosophy, Psychology, 1992, University of Texas at Arlington
    • Master of Science, Psychology, University of Texas at Arlington
    • Bachelor of Arts, Psychology, 1985, Southern Methodist University
  • Recent Courses

    • 2523  Personality
    • 2533  Social Psychology
    • 3403  Experimental Psychology
    • 5113  Professional Ethics & Standards
    • Association for Psychological Science
    • Southwestern Psychological Association
    • Society for Personality and Social Psychology
    • Psi Chi
    • Phi Beta Kappa

James Dykes, Ph.D.

Associate Professor
Department of Psychology

Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Phone: (210) 458-5706
Office: MH 4.02.82
Office hours: T 10:00 am, TH 10:00 am & 1:30 pm

Research area: Visual information processing

About
Teaching
Research
Publications
Additional Information
  • Biography

    Jim Dykes started his academic training as a pre-med BIO major at Brown University, but subsequently transferred to the University of Texas at Austin where he earned both his BA in Psychology and his PhD in Human Experimental (specializing in Visual Information Processing with strong interests in Statistics and Cognitive Development).  His switch to Experimental Psychology was largely driven by his undergraduate experience as a research assistant on a project using Sperling’s partial report paradigm to investigate iconic memory.  His early graduate research also investigated efferent readiness in motor memory and subitizing.  His dissertation and related research used Garner redundancy gain and orthogonal interference to investigate how adults and children process multiple sources of visual information.

    After receiving his PhD in Summer 1976, Jim Dykes joined the Psychology faculty at the rapidly expanding University of Texas at San Antonio in Fall 1976 (the semester in which UTSA grew from an upper-division and graduate institution into a full university).  Checking out library books was somewhat problematic for a junior faculty member younger than the median student age, but he has subsequently served in various service roles including Undergraduate and Graduate Advisor of Record, Coordinator of PSY 3413 (Experimental Psychology Labs), Core Curriculum, Institutional Review Board for Human Participation in Experiments, and Computer Technology.  The switch from mainframe cards to HeathKits to off-the shelf PCs was made possible by the expertise provided by dear colleagues in Computer Science.

    Given his focus on Visual Information Processing, Jim Dykes frequently teaches PSY 3153 (Sensation and Perception), PSY 4163 (Sensory Processes), and PSY 4183 (Visual Information Processing).  Given his interest in statistics, he also teaches PSY 5413 (Inferential Statistics) and PSY 3403 (Experimental Psychology).  He enjoys teaching PSY 1013 (Introduction to Psychology), PSY 2573 (Psychology of Thought), and PSY 3013 (Cognition) and grows with his students when using new technology and when teaching interdisciplinary and team-taught Honors seminars in Cognitive Science, Mind’s Eye: Color, and Nature vs Nurture.

    Jim’s research interests have also grown.  His interest in human processing of multidimensional visual information has led to investigations into face perception and Stroop Interference.  His interest in statistics has led to improving the sensitivity and reliability of contrast acuity measures.  His interest in computers has led to investigating the relative merits of contrast acuity tests and the maintenance of color appearance across various computer displays.  His interest in color modeling has led to investigations of the compatibility between aircrew cockpit information and laser eye protection within the visible spectrum.  He is a part-time consultant with Northrop Grumman Information Technology in support of USAF HEDO at Brooks City Base.

    Degrees

    • Ph.D. in Human Experimental Psychology, 1976, University of Texas at Austin
    • B.A. in Psychology, 1972, University of Texas at Austin 
  • Recent Courses

    • 1013  Introduction to Psychology
    • 2543  Theories of Learning
    • 2573  Psychology of Thought
    • 3153  Sensation and Perception
    • 5413  Inferential Statistics
  • Research in Progress

    • Effects of context on color constancy for computer stimuli viewed through color filters.
    • Stroop and Garner interference in a target search task using a helmet-mounted display to augment dual-task performance on a computer.
  • Recent Publications

    • McLin, L., Dykes, J., Garcia, P., & Cantu, N. (2003, December).  Comparing Contrast Acuity Functions. Poster presented at American Academy of Optometry, Dallas, TX.
    • Dykes, J.R., Martinsen, G.L., Kuyk, T., McLin, L.N., Garcia, P.V., & Salcedo, N.C. (2004, December).  Measuring the Impact of Laser Eye Protection Devices on Color Perception.  Poster presented at the American Academy of Optometry, Tampa, FL.
    • Dykes, J. (2005).  Psychophysical Test of Contrast Acuity to Aid Operational Effectiveness of Aircrew Laser Eye Protection (LEP), AFRL-HE-BR-TR-2005-0134, USAF Research Laboratory, Brooks City Base, TX, 78235.
    • Dykes, J., Maier, D., Schmeisser, E., McLin, L., and Garcia, P.  (2005) AFRL-HE-BR-TR-2005-0042, Quantifying Color Perception as a Function of In-Band Laser Eye Protection.  May 2005, USAF Research Laboratory, Brooks City-Base TX  78235.
    • Dykes, J. (2009).  AFRL-RH-BR-TR-2009-0051.  Modeling Mesopic Vision Based on Measured Photoreceptor Sensitivity.  USAF Research Laboratory, Brooks City-Base, TX 78235.
    • Kuyk T, Dykes J, LaFrance M, McLin L. (2010) Predicting errors in color naming caused by laser eye protection. Poster presented at the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology Annual Meeting.  Fort Lauderdale, FL. May 2- 6, 2010.
  • Honors and Awards

    • 2002 Air Force Research Laboratory Commander’s Cup Team Award.
    • U.S. Army Research Office Instrumentation Grant (with David M. Johnson, PI) – Bio/Chemical Sensors, Biophysical and Biocompatible Materials Initiative Instrumentation Support.  Awarded 9/2003.  Instrumentation grant for a Pritchard PR-1980B spectrophotometer ($71, 000).
    • U.S.A.F. H .E. HBCU/MI Grant -  Psychophysical Test of Contrast Acuity to Aid Operational Effectiveness of Aircrew Laser Eye Protection (LEP).  12 January 2004 ($108, 721).
    • U.S.A.F. H.E. HBCU/MI Grant - Modeling Mesopic Vision Based on  Measured Photoreceptor Sensitivity ($143, 082).  June 29, 2007

    Academic and Professional Activities

    • American Psychological Association (member) and Division 3 (Experimental Psychology)
    • American Psychological Society (member)
    • Psychonomic Society (member)
    • Consultant to TASC for AFRL.RHDO at Tri-Service Research Laboratory at Fort Sam Houston

Thomas Coyle, Ph.D.

Professor
Department of Psychology

Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Phone: (210) 458-7407
Office: MH 4.04.40
Office hours: M/F 8:50-9:20 am & 11:50 am-12:20 pm

Research area: Cognition and Development

About
Teaching
Research
Publications
Additional Information
  • Degrees

    • Ph.D. in Psychology, University of Florida
    • M.A., Psychology, Florida Atlantic University
    • B.A., Psychology, Florida Atlantic University

     

  • Recent Courses

     

    • 2503  Developmental Psychology
    • 4143  Memory
  • Research in Progress

    My research program consists of two interrelated areas. The first and primary area explores the nature and development of cognitive ability, with current emphasis on (a) the predictive validity of cognitive tests after removing general intelligence (g), and (b) the contribution of processing speed in the development of g. The second area focuses on brain aging from a cognitive neuroscience perspective, with current emphasis on cerebral health and g-loaded cognitive processes (e.g., processing speed and executive function).

  • Recent Publications

    Representative Publications (* = Student Author)

    • Coyle, T., Pillow, D., *Snyder, A, & Kochunov, P. (in press). Processing speed mediates the development of general intelligence (g) in adolescence. Psychological Science.
    • Coyle, T., *Snyder, A., Pillow, D., & Kochunov, P. (2011). SAT predicts GPA better for high ability subjects: Implications for Spearman’s Law of Diminishing Returns. Personality and Individual Differences, 50, 470-474.
    • Kochunov, P., Coyle, T., Lancaster, J., Robin, D. A., Hardies, J., Kochunov, V., Bartzokis, G., Stanely, J., Royall, D., Schlosser, A. E., *Null, M., & Fox, P. T. (2010). Processing speed is correlated with cerebral health markers in the frontal lobes as quantified by neuroimaging. Neuroimage, 49, 1190-1199.
    • Kochunov, P., Robin, D. A., Royall, D. R., Coyle, T., Lancaster, J., Kochunov, V., Schlosser, A. E., & Fox, P. T. (2009). Can structural MRI indices of cerebral integrity track cognitive trends in executive control function during normal maturation and adulthood? Human Brain Mapping, 30, 2581-2594.
    • Coyle, T. R., & Pillow, D. R. (2008). SAT and ACT predict college GPA after removing g. Intelligence, 36, 719-729.
    • Kochunov, P., Thompson, P. M., Coyle, T. R., Lancaster, J. L., Kochunov, V., Royall, D., Mangin, J. F., Rivière, D., & Fox, P. T. (2008). Relationship among neuroimaging indices of cerebral health during normal aging. Human Brain Mapping, 29, 36-45.
    • Coyle, T. R., Kochunov, P., Patel, R., Nery, F. G., Lancaster, J., Mangin, J. F., Rivière, D., Pillow, D. R., *Davis, G. J., Nicoletti, M. A., Monkul, E. S., Fox, P. T., & Soares, J. C. (2006). Cortical sulci and bipolar disorder. Neuroreport, 17, 1739-1742.
    • Coyle, T. R. (2006). Test-retest changes on scholastic aptitude tests are not related to g. Intelligence, 34, 15-27.
    • Kochunov, P., Mangin, J. F., Coyle T. R., Lancaster, J. L., Thompson, P., Rivière, D., Cointepas, Y., Regis, J., Schlosser, A., Royall, R. D., Zilles, K., Mazziotta, J., Toga, A., & Fox, P. T. (2005). Age-related morphology trends of cortical sulci. Human Brain Mapping, 26, 210-220.
    • Coyle, T. R. (2003a). A review of the worst performance rule: Evidence, theory, and alternative hypotheses. Intelligence, 31, 567-587.
    • Coyle, T. R. (2003b). IQ, the worst performance rule, and Spearman’s law: A reanalysis and extension. Intelligence, 31, 473-489.
    • Coyle, T. R. (2001a). Factor analysis of variability measures in eight independent samples of children and adults. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 78, 330-358.
    • Coyle, T. R. (2001b). IQ is related to the worst performance rule in a memory task involving children. Intelligence, 29, 117-129.

    Representative Presentations (Since 2010; * = Student Author)

    • Coyle, T., *Snyder, A., *Purcell, J., & *Huston, R. (2011, May). Test-specific variances from the SAT predict college GPA beyond general variance. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Psychological Science, Washington, DC.
    • Coyle, T., *Purcell, J., *Snyder, A., & *Huston, R. (2011, April). Predictive validity of SAT non-g variance for males and females. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the Southwestern Psychological Association, San Antonio, TX.
    • *Snyder, A., & Coyle, T. (2011, March). Does the TAKS predict first-year college GPA after removing general intelligence (g)? Poster presented at the annual UTSA College of Liberal and Fine Arts Student Research Competition, San Antonio, TX. [Poster won 2nd place in competition.]
    • Coyle, T. R. (2010, December). Predicting college GPA using test-specific variances (TSVs) from the SAT. In T. R. Coyle (Chair), Predicting academic achievement using non-g variance. Symposium conducted at the annual meeting of the International Society for Intelligence Research, Alexandria, VA.
    • *Purcell, J. M., & Coyle, T. R. (2010, December). Predicting college GPA using non-g variances from the SAT and ASVAB. In T. R. Coyle (Chair), Predicting academic achievement using non-g variance. Symposium conducted at the annual meeting of the International Society for Intelligence Research, Alexandria, VA.
    • *Snyder, A., & Coyle, T. R. (2010, December). Predicting first-year college GPA using the exit-level TAKS examination. In T. R. Coyle (Chair), Predicting academic achievement using non-g variance. Symposium conducted at the annual meeting of the International Society for Intelligence Research, Alexandria, VA.
    • Coyle, T. R. (2010, October). SAT predicts subject-specific GPAs after removing g: A latent variable approach. Invited talk at the College Board / ETS / LSAC Speaker Series, Princeton, NJ.
    • Coyle, T. R., *Snyder, A., *Purcell, J, Pillow, D. R. (2010, May). SAT predicts GPA better for high ability subjects: Influence of non-g variance. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Psychological Science, Boston, MA.
  • Honors and Awards

    • Invited Conference Organizer (with Tim Keith), International Society for Intelligence Research, San Antonio, TX, 2012
    • Symposium Chair, Predicting Academic Achievement Using Non-g Variance (Discussant: David Lubinski), International Society for Intelligence Research Conference, Alexandria, VA, 2010
    • Invited Address, SAT Predicts Subject-Specific GPAs After Removing g: A Latent Variable Approach, Speaker Series Hosted by the College Board, Educational Testing Service, and Law School Admission Council, Princeton, NJ, 2010
    • UTSA Faculty Development Leave at the College Board, New York, NY, 2009
    • Principal Investigator, A Probabilistic Reference System of the Human Brain: The Role of White and Gray Matter Atrophy in the Neuropsychological Decline of Patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment. General Clinical Research Center-Imaging Core, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 2006-2008.
    • Principal Investigator, Can Cognitive Tests Predict Brain Indicators of Mild Cognitive Impairment? San Antonio Area Foundation, 2005-2006.
    • Faculty Research Award, University of Texas at San Antonio, 1997, 2000, 2006
       

    Academic and Professional Acitivities

    • Memberships: International Society for Intelligence Research, Association for Psychological Science, Southwestern Psychological Association
    • Review Editorial Board, Frontiers in Neurogenomics, 2011-Present
    • Ad Hoc Reviewer: Child Development, Developmental Neuropsychology, Developmental Psychology, Infant and Child Development, Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, Journal of Attention Disorders, Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, Learning and Individual Differences, Memory and Cognition, Personality and Individual Differences
       

Daniel J. Beal, Ph.D.

Associate Professor
Department of Psychology

Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Phone: (210) 458-8055
Office: MH 4.02.52
Office hours: M/W 11:00-12:00 or by appt.

Research area: Emotional experience and expression at work, performance processes, longitudinal and multilevel modeling

About
Teaching
Research
Publications
Additional Information
  • Biography

    Dan Beal received his M.S. and Ph.D. from Tulane University in New Orleans. His training was primarily in experimental social psychology with additional emphasis on quantitative methods and industrial/organizational (I/O) psychology. His primary graduate research investigated the nature and motivations of overt and covert forms of interracial aggression. In addition, he also examined the link between group cohesion and performance, as well as exploring methodological research questions in meta-analysis and structural equation modeling.

    After obtaining his Ph.D., Dan accepted a post-doctoral position helping to coordinate research at the Military Family Research Institute (MFRI) at Purdue University. Funded by the Department of Defense, the MFRI was tasked with examining the links between quality of life in the military and important military outcomes such as satisfaction, commitment, retention, and performance. Here, Dan honed his interests in topics such as affect, self-regulation, performance, experience sampling methods, and multilevel modeling, all connected to military and other workplace contexts.

    In 2004, Dan accepted a position as an assistant professor of Industrial and Organizational Psychology at Rice University. While at Rice, Dan published several papers based on theories and methods developed while working with Howard Weiss at Purdue University. This work has focused primarily on the experience and expression of emotions at work, particularly the manner in which affective events translate into worker well-being, stress and fatigue, and ultimately performance. Some of this research has examined the influence of small events, such as completing onerous chores or engaging in intrinsically enjoyable tasks. Other research has emphasized events of greater significance, such as the effects of being mistreated by one's supervisor, or even the enduring effects of living through a major hurricane.

    In 2011, Dan joined the faculty of the psychology department at UTSA. Here he has continued his work linking affective events to organizational and employee outcomes. In addition, Dan is in the process of expanding his research to include earlier interests in group cohesion, group processes, and group performance. Finally, Dan has several active research projects focused on developing quantitative methods and research designs such as longitudinal modeling, meta-analysis, and experience sampling.

     

    Degrees

    • Ph.D. in Psychological Science, 2000, Tulane University
    • M.S. in Psychological Science, 1996, Tulane University
    • B.A. in Psychology (Philosopy Minor), 1994, Florida State University 
  • Recent Courses

    •     3113  Motivation and Emotion
    •     3203  Industrial and Organizational Psychology
    •     7013  Advanced Research Methods (PhD level)

     

  • Research in Progress

    .

  • Recent Publications

    • Trougakos, J. P., Hideg, I., Cheng, B. H., & Beal, D. J. (in press). Lunch breaks unpacked: The role of autonomy as a moderator of recovery during lunch. Academy of Management Journal.
    • Cantú, S. M., Simpson, J. A., Griskevicius, V., Weisberg, Y. J., Durante, K. M., & Beal, D. J. (in press). Fertile & Flirty: Ovulation changes women's behavior toward men. Psychological Science.
    • Beal, D. J. (in press). Time and Emotions at Work. Chapter to appear in A. Shipp & Y. Fried (Eds.), Time and Work (Vol. 1).
    • Beal, D. J., Trougakos, J. P., Weiss, H. M., & Dalal, R. S. (2013). Affect spin and the emotion regulation process at work. Journal of Applied Psychology, 98, 593-605.
    • Beal, D. J. & Trougakos, J. P. (2013). Episodic intrapersonal emotion regulation: Or, dealing with life as it happens. In A. Grandey, J. Diefendorff, & D. Rupp (Eds.), Emotional labor in the 21st century: Diverse perspectives on emotion regulation at work. New York, NY: Psychology Press/Routledge.
    • Beal, D. J. & Weiss, H. M. (2013). The episodic structure of life at work.  In A. Bakker & K. Daniels (Eds.), A day in the life of a happy worker. Psychology Press.
    • Sundie, J. M., Kenrick, D. T., Griskevicius, V., Tybur, J. M., Vohs, K. D., & Beal, D. J. (2011). Peacocks, Porsches, and Thorstein Veblen: Conspicuous consumption as a sexual signaling system. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 96, 350-362.
    • Beal, D. J. (2012). Industrial/Organizational Psychology. In M. R. Mehl & T. S. Conner (Eds.), Handbook of research methods for studying daily life (pp. 601-619). New York, NY: Guilford Press.
    • Beal, D. J. & Ghandour, L. (2011). Stability, change, and the stability of change in daily workplace affect. Special issue on Intraindividual Processes Linking Work and Employee Well-Being, Journal of Organizational Behavior, 32, 526-546.
    • Trougakos, J. P., Jackson, C. L., & Beal, D. J. (2011). Service without a smile:  Comparing the consequences of neutral and positive display rules. Journal of Applied Psychology, 96, 350-362.
    • Barsky, A., Kaplan, S., & Beal, D. J. (2011). Just feelings? The role of affect in the formation of organizational fairness judgments. Annual review issue, Journal of Management, 37, 248-279.

  • Honors and Awards

    • Reviewer of the Year, 2011, Journal of Business and Psychology
    • H.F. Guggenheim Dissertation Fellowship, 1999
    • Flowerree Research Fellowship, Tulane University, 1996, 1998, 1999
    • Ruiz Research Fellowship, Tulane University, 1995

    Professional Societies

    • Academy of Management
    • Divisions of Organizational Behavior and Research Methods
    • American Psychological Society
    • Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology
    • Society for Personality and Social Psychology

    Asssociate Editor

    • Journal of Management, 2012 - present

    Consulting Editor

    • Journal of Applied Psychology, 2005 - present
    • Organizational Research Methods, 2007 - present
    • Journal of Management, 2008 - 2012
    • Journal of Business and Psychology, 2010 - present

Michael Baumann, Ph.D.

Associate Professor and Graduate Advisor of Record
Department of Psychology

Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Phone: (210) 458-5720
Office: MH 4.02.80
Office hours: M 11:30 am-12:30 pm & T 2:30-3:30 pm

Research area: Social & Organizational Psychology

About
Teaching
Research
Publications
Additional Information
  • Biography

    Michael R. Baumann received his PhD from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. His graduate education combined Social and I/O psychology with a heavy dose of statistics and research methods. Upon completing his dissertation and short visiting position at Washington State University, Dr. Baumann joined the faculty at the University of Texas at San Antonio in 2001.

    Degrees

    • Ph.D. in Social/Organizational Psychology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    • M.A., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    • B.A., Northwestern University
  • Recent Courses

    • 3023  Social Psychology of Small Groups
    • 3203  Industrial/Organizational Psychology
    • 5213  Research Design (MS level)
    • 5353  Industrial/Organizational Psychology (MS level)
    • 7123  Advanced Topics in Applied Social Psychology (PhD level)
  • Research in Progress

    My main interests lie in how people interact with each other and how those interactions influence their behavior, particularly in small group settings. I’m also interested in how people’s emotional states and individual differences in how they view the world influence their behavior. More technically, my work focuses on within-group processes and performance (e.g., decision making and problem solving in groups and teams, social influence, etc.), impression formation (e.g., how the presence or absence of various physical cues alter the way others think about us), and the role of affect in decision making and behavior (e.g., how emotional state alters decision making processes, differences in response to threat vs reward, etc.). More detail on the types of questions I ask in each area are below.

    • Information sharing and weighting in groups. We’ve all heard “two heads are better than one.” Unfortunately, that’s not always true. People form groups in the hopes that each member will contribute some unique knowledge or skill to the effort. What research has shown is people aren’t very good at this. For example, groups generally talk more about the information every member knew before discussion than about the unique information each member brought. Making matters worse, even when unique information is discussed, it gets less attention / trust / weight than common information. These issues have relevance not only to work teams in general but to medical teams and interdisciplinary research teams as well. I look at various factors that influence these biases, including factors relating to how members see each other (e.g., perceived expertise, perceived trustworthiness), performance incentives, and emotional state.
    • Division of labor and coordination in groups. There’s an old saying that “many hands make light the work.” The idea is that working together as a team makes things easier for everyone and that a team will outperform individuals working alone. Unfortunately, sometimes group members get in each others’ way. Just think of the last time you helped a friend move! For many hands to make light the work, members have to find a way to divide up the task and coordinate their efforts. Otherwise you end up duplicating each other’s efforts, or worse, trying to turn the couch different ways and getting it stuck in the door. Recent examples of my work in this area include looking at factors people take into account when deciding how to divide up a group task (e.g., the “glory” the member would receive and the “difficulty” of performing that task component).
    • Individual differences and physical cues in impression formation. When we first meet people, we don’t know who they are or what to expect. To form a guess, we rely on what we see – physical cues such as how they dress, body alteration, grooming habits, and attractiveness. What people infer from these things varies based on the person. Put a little differently, beauty is in the eye of the beholder. I look at individual differences, including gender, in the inferences people form. Many of the things I look at are informed by ideas of intra-sexual competition. This is the notion that people of the same gender compete with each other for mates. For example, research has shown that the impression someone forms of an attractive woman depends both on the perceiver’s gender and attractiveness. Although attractive females are rated more positively than unattractive females by males and by attractive females, the reverse is true when the rater is a less attractive female. Ongoing projects suggest some of the perceptions I examine may lead to hostility against the person being perceived or even downstream health issues.
    • Individual differences in sensitivity to loss versus gain and behavior. We all have at least that one friend who is always chasing a dream regardless of the cost. At the same time, we all have at least one friend who passes up opportunities for enormous gains whenever the gain carries even the slightest risk of a loss. People talk about this a lot of different ways, but regardless of the terminology, this appears to be a fairly stable difference. Some people are reward seeking and relatively insensitive to loss while others are loss avoidant and relatively insensitive to gains. I look at how this impacts their behavior. Most recently, I have examined this in the context of intra-group processes and in the context of differences between those who never try cigarettes, those who have a cigarette habit, and those who have successfully quit using cigarettes.

     

     

  • Recent Publications

    Representative Publications: Groups

    • Baumann, M.R., & Bonner, B.L. (2013). Member awareness of expertise, information sharing, information weighting, and group decision making. Small Group Research, 44(5), 532-562
    • Bonner, B. L. & Baumann, M. R. (2012). Leveraging Member Expertise to Facilitate Knowledge Transfer and Demonstrability in Groups. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology , 102(2), 337-350.
    • Baumann, M. R., & Bonner, B. L. (2011). Expected Group Longevity and Expected Task Difficulty on Learning and Recall: Implications for the Development of Transactive Memory. Group Dynamics: Theory, Research and Practice. 15(3), 220-232.
    • Baumann, M. R. & Bonner, B. L. (2004). The effects of variability and expectations on utilization of member expertise and group performance Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 93, 89-101.

     

    Representative Projects on Other Topics

    • Baumann, M. R., Gohm, C. L., & Bonner, B. L. (2011). Phased Training for High Reliability Occupations: Live Fire Exercises for Civilian Firefighters. Human Factors: The Journal of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, 53(5), 548-557.
    • *Carrizales, L., & Baumann, M. R. (2014). Risky Business: The Effects of Sexy Attire on Impressions of Employees and Company Image. Poster to be presented at the 2014 meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology.
    • *Harriman, C., & Baumann, M. R. (2013). Old reliable or evil weasel: Facial hair, behavioral expectations, and relationship interest. Poster presented at the 2013 meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology.
    • Baumann, M. R., Garza, R. T., & Lopez, S. G. (2013).  Behavioral inhibition / approach sensitivity profiles and smoking among college students. Poster presented at the 2013 meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology.
    • *Hainstock, M. & Baumann, M. R. (2011). Intrasexual competition and differences in acceptance of male-female vs. female-male interracial couples. Poster presented at the 2011 meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology.

     

    *indicates author was a student or advisee when project began

  • Current Graduate Advisees

    • David Oviatt (PhD student)
    • Janet Bennett (PhD student)
    • Tuesday DeHoyos (MS student)
    • James Deller (MS student)

    Affiliations / Memberships

    • Society for Experimental Social Psychology  (Fellow)
    • Interdisciplinary Network for Group Research (Board Member)
    • Society for Personality and Social Psychology
    • Academy of Management

    Editorial / Professional Boards

    •  Group Dynamics  (Editorial Board)
    •  Small Group Research (Editorial Board)
    •  Interdisciplinary Network for Group Research (Board of Directors)

    Recent Grant Reviewing

    •  National Science Foundation (ad hoc)
    •  Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (ad hoc)

    Additional Reviewing within last calendar year

    •  Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
    •  Journal of Experimental Social Psychology 
    •  Psychological Science
    •  Group Processes & Intergroup Relations

Raymond Baird, Ph.D.

Professor of Psychology and Senior Associate Dean, College of Sciences
Department of Psychology

Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Phone: (210) 458-4951
Office: MH 4.03.50
Office hours: T/W/F 1:10-1:55 pm

Research area: Psychology and Law

About
Teaching
Research
Publications
Additional Information
  • Biography

    Raymond R. Baird, Professor of Psychology, was awarded an A.B. in Psychology from Eastern New Mexico University. He earned a M.S. and Ph.D. in Psychology from the University of Washington.  Before coming to UTSA, he taught at Wright State University, where he rose to the rank of Associate Professor, headed an interdisciplinary graduate program, and earned an award for outstanding undergraduate teaching. Upon his arrival at newly-opened UTSA, he helped to develop both the undergraduate curriculum and the master’s program.  He served at Director of the Division of Behavioral and Cultural Sciences for 16 years.  He then served as Interim Director of the Division of Mathematics and Statistics for four years, followed by a one-year appointment as Interim Chair of the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences.  He is currently completing his second year of service as Senior Associate Dean in the College of Sciences.

    His research emphasis in the past decade has been psychology and law, revolving primarily around perception of sentencing equity.  The principle underlying this work is that in order to “balance the books,” society expects the perpetrator of a crime to experience outcomes (e.g., punishments and losses) that are worse than those experienced by the victim of the crime, but not excessive.  Thus society expects the legal system to make the punishment fit the totality of the specific circumstances of the crime.  When a given crime is associated with a high level of victim suffering, for instance, the ideal punishment will be more severe.  In addition, society requires that the judicial system weigh factors associated with the criminal.  The optimal punishment should fit not only the crime but also should fit the criminal as well. For example, restitution and remorse have the effect of reducing the severity of the optimal punishment.  This research program has yielded several poster presentations, four reporting results from master’s theses done under his direction.  An offshoot of this research in the subfield of psychology of law has focused on adult memory errors and has yielded several additional posters (three with undergraduate honor’s students working under his direction).  Research summarized in a publication growing out of this line of work (see note 1) demonstrated that experts sometimes make more errors of commission (as opposed to errors of omission) than non-experts.

    Degrees

    Ph.D., Developmental Psychology, Philosophy, University of Washington

    M.S., Psychology, University of Washington

    B.A., Psychology, Eastern New Mexico University

  • Recent Courses

    • 1013  Introduction to Psychology
    • 2543  Theories of Learning

     

  • Research in Progress

    .

  • Recent Publications

    • Baird, R. R., (2003). Experts sometimes show more false recall than novices: A
      cost of knowing too much. (vol. 13, pp. 349-355). Learning and Individual
      Differences.
    • Baird, R. R., West, V. L., (1981). Stereotypic images of adoptive families. (vol.
      33, pp. 19-23). Texas Psychologist.
    • Rupert, P. S., Baird, R. R., (1979). Modification of cognitive tempo on a hapticvisual
      matching task. (vol. 135, pp. 164-174). Journal of Genetic Psychology.
    • Baird, R. R., (1979). More abnormal psychology texts: Observations on a mixed
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    • Senior Associate Dean, College of Sciences, UTSA, 2007 - Present
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    • City of San Antonio Higher Education Authority member

Ray Lopez, Ph.D.

Senior Lecturer
Department of Psychology

Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Phone: 210-458-5731
Office: MH 4.04.22
Office hours: WH 6:30-7:30 pm

Research area: Behavioral neuroscience, artificial intelligence, ethics

About
Teaching
Research
Publications
Additional Information
  • Biography

    Dr. Lopez earned his bachelor's degree in psychology from The University of Texas, where he worked for 4 years in the research laboratory of Abram Amsel, one of the leading theorists in behaviorism.  He completed an honors project in Dr. Amsels lab studying the Pavlovian conditioning of the orienting response in very young rats. 

    Dr. Lopez earned a master of science and doctoral degree in experimental physiological psychology from the University of Texas at Arlington, under the guidance of Verne C. Cox.  His graduate research studied the role of supraspinal neural pathways in mediating analgesia for tonic pain.  The work that Dr. Lopez did at UT Arlington has served as the foundation for several prolific programs of research investigating the nature of pain, work which continues to this day.  Following his graduate studies, Dr. Lopez worked as a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, working in the area of pharmacology.  His work there was concerned with understanding the role of serotonin in mediating depression and anxiety. 

    Dr Lopez left academia in 1997 to pursue other opportunities.  He is currently the Chief Technology and Innovation Officer for the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities. Prior to working at HACU, Dr. Lopez was a managing consultant with IBM Global Services, a consultant with EDS, and technology director for a couple of dotcoms. While working for these companies, Dr. Lopez worked on a very wide variety of projects with many different clients throughout the world.

    He is happily married and has two great kids.

    Degrees

    • Ph.D. in Experimental Psychology, University of Texas at Arlington (1993)
    • M.S. in Experimental Psychology, University of Texas at Arlington (1992)
    • B.A. in Psychology, The University of Texas (1986)
  • Recent Courses

    • PSYC 1013 Introduction to Psychology
    • PSYC 3403 Experimental Psychology
    • PSYC 3153 Sensation and Perception
    • PSYC 3103 Cognition

     

  • Research in Progress

    • Behavioral neuroscience
    • Computer-mediated interactions
    • Virtual communities
    • Artificial intelligence
    • Ethics
  • Recent Publications

    • Daws, L., Lopez, R., Frazer, A. (1998). Effects of antidepressant treatment on inhibitory avoidance behavior and amygdaloid beta-adrenoceptors in rats. Neuropsychopharmacology, 19, 300-313.
    • Lopez, R., Cox, V.C. (1992). Analgesia for tonic pain by self-administered lateral hypothalamic stimulation. Neuroreport, 3, 311-314.
    • Lopez, R., Young, S.L., Cox, V.C. (1991). Analgesia for formalin-induced pain by lateral hypothalamic stimulation. Brain Research, 511, 1-6.
    • Lopez, R., Frazer, A., (1996). Modulation of ultrasonic vocalizations by serotonin-1A agonists and antagonists in young male Wistar rats. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience, Washington, DC, November 17, 1996.
    • Lopez, S.G.., Lopez, R. (2007). Inferential accuracy and interaction quality in dyadic, online interactions.  Paper presented at the 2007 Annual Conference of the Association for Psychological Science, May 25, 2007.
  • Affiliations

    • Association for Psychological Science (Charter Member)
    • Society for Neuroscience
    • Philosophy of Science Association
    • American Catholic Philosophical Association
    • International Society for MacIntyrean Enquiry

    Links

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