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College of Liberal and Fine Arts

  • UTSA students in Costa Rica

  • UTSA students in Paris

  • math and verbal SAT scores climb higher with each year of foreign language study

  • "On sourit tous dans la même langue." Language unites all cultures.

  • UTSA students in Japan

Main Office: 4.01.01 MH  |  Phone: (210) 458-4373  |  University of Texas at San Antonio, Dept of Modern Languages and Literatures, One UTSA Circle, San Antonio, TX 78249


The Department of Modern Languages and Literatures at UTSA offers students a wide variety of language study choices with courses in Spanish, French, Italian, German, Russian, Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Arabic, linguistics, translation and interpretation, and comparative literature. Numerous UTSA students opt to enhance their future marketability by taking foreign language courses to support their career goals in business, the law, government work, education, and many other fields.  read more

Why study other languages? 

Did you know that studying a second language can improve your skills and grades in math and English and can increase college entrance exam scores such as SATs, ACTs, GREs, MCATs, and LSATs? read more


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New Daydi-Tolson Book: Insectarium


Associate Professor Dr. Santiago Daydi-Tolson’s most recent book, Insectarium, is about – you guessed it – the diverse and colorful world of insects. This unique collection of poems about insects deals with the desires and fears of all life forms as represented in the different insects that surround us in a persistent determination for survival. Life, the blind forces of biological continuity, finds in insects its iconic representation.


Insectarium is available for purchase on Amazon.


Dr. Daydi-Tolson, who teaches Spanish Literature in the UTSA Department of Modern Languages and Literatures, has authored several other books: El último viaje de Gabriela Mistral, Voces y ecos en la poesía de José Angel Valente, The Post-Civil War Spanish Social Poets, and Under the Walnut Tree.  He is also author of a blog on Hispanic culture and literature, Café Labrapalabra.