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College of Liberal and Fine Arts

Alisa Hartsell, M.A.

Lecturer I
Department of History

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Phone: 210-458-5717
Office: MH 04.05.13
Office hours: MTWR 9-10am

Research area: US History, World History, Migration History

About

Savannah Carroll, M.A.

Lecturer I
Department of History

Email: email coming soon
Phone: (210) 458-5726
Office: MH 4.04.13
Office hours: W 2-5 pm

Research area: Mexico, Latin American Studies

About

Ron Haas, Ph.D.

Lecturer II
Department of History

Email: email coming soon
Phone: (210) 458-5726
Office: MH 4.04.13
Office hours: M 4-6pm or by appt.

Research area: American and Modern European Intellectual History

About

Andrew Konove, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor
Department of History

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Phone: (210) 458-8716
Office: MH 4.04.06
Office hours: T 3:45-5:15; R 12:30-2 pm

Research area: Latin American History

About
  • Biography

    Andrew Konove, Assistant Professor of History, received his B.A. in History from Haverford College and his M.A., M.Phil., and Ph.D. in History from Yale University, where he also received a Graduate Certificate of Concentration in Latin American Studies. His research focuses on the political, social, and economic history of Mexico in the late colonial and early national periods. His current book project, “Black Market City: Shadow Economies and Popular Politics in Mexico City’s Baratillo Marketplace,” traces the history of Mexico City’s infamous thieves market from the seventeenth century to the twentieth.  The project is based on his Ph.D. dissertation, which was awarded Yale University’s John Addison Porter Prize in 2013.  In 2015, the journal The Americas will publish his article, “On the Cheap: The Baratillo Marketplace and the Shadow Economy of Eighteenth-Century Mexico City.” Dr. Konove’s work has also appeared online in the foreign policy journal The National Interest.  His second project expands his research focus beyond Mexico to examine the history of informal coins, called tlacos, which circulated in regions across Spanish America in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries.

Catherine Clinton, Ph.D.

Denman Endowed Professor in American History
Department of History

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Phone: (210) 458-5705
Office: MH 4.04.06
Office hours: M-W 1-3 or by appt.

Research area: U.S. History, Civil War, Gender Studies

About
  • Biography

    Dr. Clinton is a pioneering historian of the American South and the Civil War.  She is the author or editor of 14 books, including The Other Civil War: American Women in the Nineteenth Century, Southern Families at War: Loyalty and Conflict in the Civil War South, and Harriet Tubman: The Road to Freedom.

    Her books Divided Houses: Gender and the Civil War and Mrs. Lincoln: A Life are among several that have been History Book Club selections.  Dr. Clinton also has written history books for children, presented at numerous academic conferences, and served as a consultant to Steven Spielberg’s film Lincoln.  In 2016, Dr. Clinton will hold the prestigious position of president of the Southern Historical Association.  Dr. Clinton earned her B.A. from Harvard and Ph.D. from Princeton and has taught previously at the Citadel, Wesleyan, Brandeis, and, most recently, Queens University in Belfast, Northern Ireland.

Neel Baumgardner, Ph.D.

Lecturer II
Department of History

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Office: MH 4.04.13
Office hours: TR 9-10 am or by appt.

Research area: U.S. History, Borderlands, National Parks History

About
  • Biography

    Neel Baumgardner received a B.B.A. and a Ph.D. in history from the University of Texas at Austin and an M.B.A. from Southern Methodist University. Dr. Baumgardner's research focuses on the development and protection of national parks and wilderness areas. His book in progress, titled "Unbordering North America: Creating International Parks along the Periphery of Canada, Mexico, and the United States," examines four different parks in two regions: Waterton Lakes and Glacier in the northern Rocky Mountains of Alberta and Montana, and Big Bend and the Maderas del Carmen in the Chihuahuan Desert of Texas and the northern Mexican state of Coahuila. Dr. Baumgardner teaches courses in American Studies and history.

Jerri Mitchell, M.A.

Lecturer I
Department of History

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Phone: 210-458-5717
Office: MH 4.05.16
Office hours: MWF 10:00-11:00 or by appt

Research area: World Civilizations

About

Andrew Highsmith, Ph.D

Affiliated Faculty Member
Department of History

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Research area: U.S. History, Urban History, Public Policy

About

Felix Almaraz, Ph.D.

Professor Emeritus
Department of History

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Research area: U.S. History, Texas History, Borderlands, American Southwest

About
  • Biography

    Felix Almaraz, Professor of History, received a B.A. and an M.A. from St. Mary's University and a Ph.D. from the University of New Mexico. Dr. Almaraz's teaching and research reflects an engagement with processes within Hispanic communities. His main teaching areas include: The Spanish Borderlands, Texas, Colonial Latin America, Imperial and Modern Spain. In recent publications such as Knight Without Armor: Carlos E. Castañeda, A Biography of a Mexican-American Historian, 1896-1958. Texas A&M University Press and Madero in Texas. Corona Publishing Co., 2001, Dr. Almaraz examines the lives and contributions of transnational historical figures. His most recent and significant grants include a 1994 President's Distinguished Achievement Award, an Excellence in Research award in 1988, and a Senior Fulbright Lectureship in the Republic of Argentina.

Bruce Daniels, Ph.D.

Professor Emeritus
Department of History

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Research area: U.S. History, Colonial and Revolutionary America, New England, Popular Culture

About

David Johnson, Ph.D.

Professor Emeritus
Department of History

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Office hours: Out of Country

Research area: U.S. History, Urban History, Crime, Immigration

About

Elaine Turney, Ph.D.

Senior Lecturer
Department of History

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Phone: (210) 458-8718
Office: MH 4.02.70

Research area: U.S. History, Western Civilizations, Environmental History

About

John Reynolds, Ph.D.

Professor
Department of History

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Phone: (210) 458-7403
Office: MH 4.03.48
Office hours: M 10-11; W 12-1; F 2-3

Research area: U.S. History, Political History

About
  • Biography

    John F. Reynolds, Professor of History, acquired his B.A. and M.A. from Michigan State University and his Ph.D. from Rutgers University. He is a political historian specializing in the Gilded Age and Progressive Era in the United States.  He has published two books and several articles addressing the regulation of political parties and the electoral process.  His most recent essay, “The Hustling Candidate and the Advent of the Direct Primary,” appeared in the Journal of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era (2013).   His research has a social science approach and he has taught graduate courses in quantitative methods in history at UTSA as well as in the University of Michigan’s  InterUniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research summer program.  Reynolds also has had a longstanding interest in the use of multimedia in instruction dating back to his days as an editor of H-Net’s H-MMEDIA.  He continues to experiment with internet based instruction.   Recently he was the principle investigator on a four year grant for developing a hybrid version of the U. S. history survey to be taught partly on-line.  He is also teaches courses in local and public history.  Reynolds’ current research interests have shifted to historical demography where he delves into the baptismal and burial records of San Antonio’s San Fernando parish from 1780 to 1860.

Jodi Peterson, M.A.

Lecturer II
Department of History

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Phone: (210) 458-6643
Office: MH 4.02.62
Office hours: No summer hours.

Research area: U.S. History

About

Catherine Nolan-Ferrell, Ph.D.

Graduate Advisor of Record
Department of History

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Phone: (210) 458-7452
Office: MH 4.04.34
Office hours: W 10-11am; R 5-7pm or by appt

Research area: Modern Mexico, Labor History

About
  • Biography

    Catherine Nolan-Ferrell, Associate Professor of History, received an A.B. from Cornell University, an M.A. from Tulane University, and a Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin. Dr. Nolan-Ferrell's research interests are in the Mexican Revolution and post-revolutionary Mexico, migration and national identity in Mexico, and gender in Latin America. Her book in progress, tentatively titled Negotiating Revolution: Labor Organizing and Identity in Southern Chiapas, 1880-1950 is on campesino activism in the coffee-growing region of Chiapas, Mexico. Dr. Nolan-Ferrell teaches courses on Latin American history from the colonial to modern periods.

Wing Chung Ng, Ph.D.

Associate Professor
Department of History

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Phone: (210) 458-5703
Office: MH 4.04.20
Office hours: TR 1-2pm or by appt

Research area: Modern China, East Asia, Migration History

About
  • Biography

    Wing Chung Ng, Associate Professor of History, received a B.A. and an M.A. from the University of Hong Kong and a Ph.D. from the University of British Columbia. His training is in modern China with emphasis on social and cultural history. His research interest has been in the broad area of the Chinese overseas migration, especially regarding questions of social institutions, community structure, and identity formation. His study of the ethnic Chinese in Malaysia and Singapore and later in Canada has put him among the first cohort of Chinese historians who engaged in a serious examination of the global Chinese Diaspora. Among his major publications are an article in Modern Asian Studies, a chapter in the Encyclopedia of the Chinese Overseas, and a historical monograph on the Chinese in Vancouver. His current project is on Cantonese opera, a form of regional theater that was highly popular in the Guangzhou-Hong Kong area as well as among Cantonese-speaking Chinese migrants overseas. He intends to foreground the theme of mobility and write a transnational history of Cantonese Opera on a broad global canvas. Dr. Ng has taught courses in Chinese history, World Civilization, Modern Japan, Migration, and Historical Methods. His research interests and teaching experiences place him in an excellent position to make substantial contributions to the proposed Ph.D. program.

Rhonda Minten, M.A.

Lecturer I
Department of History

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Phone: (210) 458-2736
Office: MH 4.05.16
Office hours: MW 8-8:45, 10:30-11:30; F 8-8:45 am or by appt

Research area: U.S. History, Texas History, World Civilizations

About

Gregg Michel, Ph.D.

Department Chair
Department of History

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Phone: (210) 458-4033
Office: MH 4.04.06
Office hours: R 5-6pm or by appt

Research area: U.S. History, Social and Political History

About
  • Biography

    Gregg L. Michel, Associate Professor of History, received a B.A. from the University of Chicago and an M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Virginia. Dr. Michel's scholarly work focuses on movements for social change in post-World War II America, particularly in the 1960s South. He has published several articles and delivered numerous papers on this topic. His book, Struggle for a Better South: The Southern Student Organizing Committee, 1964-1969, examines the turbulent history of the bending progressive white student organizations in the 1960s South. His expertise in such content areas as the history of the civil rights movement and post-World War II southern and African-American history have helped to expand the graduate program, and the diverse methodologies he employs in his research allows him to expose his students to a wide range of historical approaches, including the use of oral testimony to access the attitudes and beliefs of ordinary people in the past. Dr. has taught Historical Methods, a course which is required of all graduate students. The course seeks to introduce students to the historian's craft through an examination of a variety of historical methodologies and a focus on basic writing and analytical skills. As the course title suggests, the class is not organized around a particular topic or time period but rather the methods historians use to make sense of the past. As a foundational course for graduate students, he seeks to expose students to numerous approaches to researching and understanding the past.

David Libby, Ph.D.

Senior Lecturer
Department of History

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Phone: (210) 458-7402
Office: BV 4.364
Office hours: W 5:30-6pm or by appt

Research area: U.S. History

About

Patrick Kelly, Ph.D.

Associate Professor
Department of History

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Phone: (210) 458-7404
Office: MH 4.04.30
Office hours: T 2-5:30; W 8:30-10 am or by appt.

Research area: Modern U.S. History, Civil War History, Social History

About
Publications
  • Biography

    Patrick J. Kelly, Associate Professor of History, grew up in Austin, and graduated with a B.A. in History from U.T.-Austin.  In 1992 he received his Ph.D. from New York University. Before coming to UTSA in 1997, Dr. Kelly served as Lecturer in Social Studies at Harvard University and Visiting Professor of History at Tufts University. At Harvard he was awarded an award for excellence in teaching.  His first book, Creating a National Home: Building the Veterans' Welfare State, 1860-1900 (Harvard University Press), focused on the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, the direct bureaucratic precursor to today’s Veterans Health Administration. His article, "The Election of 1896 and the Restructuring Civil War Memory," examines the Republican Party's deployment of Civil War in its effort to defeat William Jennings Bryan. Dr. Kelly’s research now focuses on the interconnections between the Civil War and the French intervention into Mexico, with a focus on events in the Rio Grande borderlands. His recent article, “The North American Crisis of the 1860s,” argues that the U.S. Civil War and French intervention must be viewed in a continental perspective.  His recent article, "The European Revolutions of 1848 and the Transnational Turn in Civil War History" (Journal of the Civil War Era, September 2014) examines recent histories that embed the Civil War within global history.  Dr. Kelly has received a Charles A. Ryskamp Research Fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies, an “Extending the Reach” fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities, and a Faculty Development Leave from the University of Texas at San Antonio. 

    He teaches courses (both undergraduate and graduate) on the Civil War and World War II, the introductory graduate Theories and Methods class, and the Proseminar-Seminar capstone M.A. course.
    He also teaches both halves of the undergraduate U.S. survey, Texas History, Historical Methods, the Senior Seminar in History.

     

    The San Antonio Express-News published the following article by Dr. Kelly, and it examines the interconnections between the U.S. Civil War and the French intervention into Mexico.  Click here to view the article.

    Dr. Kelly also wrote an article for the New York Times about President Lincoln. It can be viewed here.

  • Recent Publications

    The following article examines the interconnections between the U.S. Civil War and the French intervention into Mexico.  It was published in the San Antonio Express-News in July 2013.

    http://www.mysanantonio.com/opinion/commentary/article/Let-us-hail-Gettysburg-and-Puebla-4687241.php

     

    To read Dr. Kelly's article, "The North American Crisis of the 1860s," click here. It was published in The Journal of the Civil War Era in September 2012.

     

    To ready Dr. Kelly's article, "The Election of 1869 and the Restructuring of Civil War Memory," click here. It was published in Civil War History in September 2003.

     

Lesli Hicks, M.A.

Lecturer II
Department of History

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Phone: (210) 458-4672
Office: MH 4.05.16
Office hours: F 1-2 pm

Research area: U.S. History, Texas History

About

Anne Hardgrove, Ph.D.

Associate Professor
Department of History

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Phone: (210) 458-7402
Office: MH 4.04.44
Office hours: No Fall 2014 office hours.

Research area: South Asia, Cultural and Social History, World History

About
  • Biography

    Anne Hardgrove, Associate Professor of History, received a B.A. from Carleton College and Ph.D. in Anthropology and History from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Dr. Hardgrove's focus is interdisciplinary, with a geographical concentration on South Asia, in particular India. Her dissertation sought to address the question of how people begin to think of themselves as larger regional and pan-regional communities. This project was awarded the American Historical Association Gutenberg-e Prize for Outstanding Dissertation in History. In 2002, she published an electronic book with Columbia University Press, which is based upon her dissertation and further research. The title of this monograph is: Community and Public Culture: The Marwaris in Calcutta c. 1897 - 1997. Her current research, entitled "The Global Erotic: Translating the Kamasutra" seeks to address issues about the global construction of sexuality, in light of the transnational circulation and flow of erotic texts and ideas. She situates sexuality along the lines of colonialism, gender, class, and cross-cultural exchange. Her project also attempts to bridge the divide usually imposed between colony and metropole, and considers American appropriations of sexual ideas from other cultures. Specifically, she seeks to make bridges between Indian and U.S. histories. Dr. Hardgrove's teaching responsibilities -- which include teaching two undergraduate courses in world history -- have helped her to develop her expertise in that area, and she has been able to incorporate significant global and comparative perspectives into her graduate teaching.

David Hansen, M.A.

Lecturer III
Department of History

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Phone: (210) 458-5708
Office: MH 4.04.10
Office hours: TR 10-11:15 or by appt.

Research area: U.S. History

About

Kolleen Guy, Ph.D.

Associate Professor
Department of History

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Phone: (210) 458-4371
Office: MH 4.04.16
Office hours: TR 10-11 am or by appt

Research area: Modern France, European History, Economic and Cultural History

About
  • Biography

    Kolleen M. Guy currently holds the position of Ricardo Romo Distinguished Professor in the Honors College at UTSA.  Her area of specialization is modern European political and social history. The focus of her current research is on the development of ideas about environment, identity, and place through production, consumption, and regulation of “quality” foods in global markets.

    Her book on the history of champagne in the 19th and 20th centuries, When Champagne Became French: Wine and the Making of French Identity, 1820-1920 (Johns Hopkins University Press, hardback 2003; paperback 2007), was awarded the 2004 Champagne Veuve Clicquot Wine Book Prize and the 2003 Gourmand International, World Book Awards prize in Barcelona, Spain for the “Best Wine History Book.”

    In addition to her book, she has published numerous articles and book chapters on wine, cheese, and gastronomy.  Her work has been featured on National Public Radio, CBS Sunday Morning, and the National Geographic channel. Guy is also the recipient of grants from the Fulbright Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Institute for Advanced Studies at the U.S.Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C.

    After earning her PhD from Indiana University in 1995, Guy taught at the the University of Texas at San Antonio in the history department and the Honors College. Her courses range from the cultural history of Europe and to food in the modern world.  Her most recent teaching awards include the University of Texas  Board of Regents Distinguished Teaching Award and the UTSA President’s Distinguished Teaching Award.

LaGuana Gray, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor
Department of History

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Phone: (210) 458-6105
Office: MH 4.04.28
Office hours: MWF 12:30-1:30

Research area: U.S. History, African American Studies, Gender Studies

About

Jerry Gonzalez, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor
Department of History

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Phone: (210) 458-5934
Office: MH 4.03.04
Office hours: No summer hours.

Research area: Chicana/o History, Metropolitan History, Borderlands History

About

Gabriela Gonzalez, Ph.D.

Associate Professor
Department of History

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Phone: (210) 458-7463
Office: MH 4.03.06

Research area: Chicana/o History, U.S. - Mexico Borderlands, Gender Studies, Social and Political History

About
  • Biography

    Gabriela Gonzalez is an Associate Professor of History.  She received her Ph.D. in History from Stanford University in 2005.  Her research centers on transborder political and social activists in South Texas from 1900 to 1960.  Dr. Gonzalez's book under contract with Oxford University Press is titled Redeeming La Raza:  Transborder Modernity, Race, Respectability, and Rights.  Also forthcoming is a book chapter on the transnational advocacy of journalist Jovita Idar to appear in the upcoming edited volume, Texas Women/American Women:  Their Lives and Times (University of Georgia Press, 2014).  Dr. Gonzalez has started work on her second book project, a political biography of the Idar family.  She has published some of her work on transborder activism and the politics of race, class, and gender in various encyclopedic articles as well as a full-length 2003 article appearing in Frontiers: A Journal of Women’s History focused on Carolina Munguía and Emma Tenayuca.  The University of Nebraska Press reprinted this article in 2007.  Both the article and its reprint were part of the Gender in the Borderlands Conference proceedings, edited by Antonia I. Castañeda and Sue Armitage.

    Dr. Gonzalez teaches U.S. history, the history of the U.S.-Mexican borderlands, Latina/o history, women’s history, and Historical Methods.  She was selected as an awardee of the Ford Foundation Diversity Fellowship for 2007-2008.  In 2012-2013, she served as the UTSA Institute of Texan Cultures Visiting Scholar.  In this capacity she organized The UTSA-ITC Civil and Human Rights in Texas Series involving undergraduate student activists, graduate student researchers, community activists, established scholars and public intellectuals who came together to examine the meanings, implications, and promise of struggles for rights across the axes of difference as experienced today and in previous eras.

Rhonda Gonzales, Ph.D.

Associate Professor
Department of History

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Phone: (210) 458-4026
Office: MH 4.04.48
Office hours: No Fall 2014 office hours.

Research area: African History, Linguistics, Diaspora, Mexican History

About
  • Biography

    Rhonda Gonzales, Associate Professor of History, received a B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. from UCLA. Dr. Gonzales teaches courses on all eras of African history, the African Diaspora, and World History to 1500. Her research areas include comparative historical linguistics, the history of Bantu religion, and the African presence in Colonial Mexico. She was recently awarded the 2004 American Historical Association Gutenberg-e Prize for Outstanding Dissertation in History. Her forthcoming book, "Continuity and Change: Thought, Belief, and Practice in the History off the Ruvu People of Central-East Tanzania, ca. 200 BCE to 1900 CE," will be published by Columbia University Press in 2007.

Kirsten Gardner, Ph.D.

Associate Professor
Department of History

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Phone: (210) 458-2752
Office: BV 4.340
Office hours: T 4-6pm or by appt. (downtown)

Research area: U.S. History, Gender Studies, Social History

About
  • Biography

    Kirsten Gardner, Associate Professor of History, received a B.A. from Georgetown University and an M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Cincinnati. Dr. Gardner has taught undergraduate courses in U.S. History, Women and Gender Studies, modern U.S. history, Gender and Technology and the History of Medicine. At the graduate level, she has taught classes in U.S. Women's History. She emphasizes comparative themes in her courses. Dr. Gardner's research and publishing interests focus on issues of women's health, particularly the history of female cancers. In May 2006, UNC published her first book, "Early Detection Women, Cancer, and Awareness Campaigns in the Twentieth-Century United States. Since joining UTSA, she has published several articles including, "Hiding the Scars: A History of Post-Mastectomy Prostheses," "From Cotton to Silicone: A History of Breast Prosthesis Since World War II", and "Informing Women: Early Cancer Detection Skills." In addition, she has completed book reviews that have appeared in The Journal of Women's History and Enterprise and Society. She is the Undergraduate Coordinater of the History Department, and also participates regularly in committee work that focuses on the development of the Women and Gender Studies program at UTSA. She has chaired/co-chaired Women's History Month 2001-2004. Dr. Gardner's teaching and research interests create opportunities for students interested in engaging in comparative work between the history of women and medical science and gender studies in the United States and other parts of the world.

Michele Debs, M.A.

Lecturer I
Department of History

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Phone: (210) 458-4672
Office: MH 4.05.16
Office hours: MW 3:30-4:20; TR 5-5:50

Research area: U.S. History

About

Jennifer Dilley, M.A.

Lecturer II
Department of History

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Phone: (210) 458-6643
Office: MH 4.02.62
Office hours: MWF 12-1 pm

Research area: U.S. History, World Civilizations

About

Brian Davies, Ph.D.

Professor
Department of History

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Phone: (210) 458-5702
Office: MH 4.04.24
Office hours: TR 9:30-11:30 am

Research area: Russia and Soviet Union, European Cultural History, Islam, Military History

About
  • Biography

    Brian Davies, Professor of History, received a B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. from The University of Chicago. Dr. Davies specializes in Russian History. He has additional research interests in early modern European, Ottoman, and Central Asian history and is especially interested in the comparative study of state building in the early modern era, subaltern social history, and the development of the capitalist world-system. He has published three monographs-- State Power and Community in Early Modern Russia (London: Palgrave MacMillan, 2004); Warfare, State and Society on the Black Sea Steppe, 1500-1700 (Routledge, 2007); Empire and Military Revolution in Eastern Europe (Continuum, 2011)—an edited volume, Warfare in Eastern Europe, 1500-1800 (Brill, 2011), and contributed two chapters to The Cambridge History of Russia. Volume One: From Early Rus' to 1689 (Cambridge University Press, 2006). He is at work on another book. Dr. Davies has developed several graduate level courses addressing transnational issues, among them HIS 5013: Readings in Modern European History; HIS 5063: Readings in Early Modern European History; HIS 6483 Topics in Comparative History: Empire; and HIS 6813/ 6903 Proseminar/Seminar Sequence: The Making of the Modern Capitalist World-System. Davies is also available for Independent Study on topics in the political and social history of Russia and Eastern Europe, early modern Western Europe, Dar al-Islam, Central Asia, military history, and comparative studies.

Andria Crosson, M.A.

Lecturer II
Department of History

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Phone: (210) 458-5717
Office: MH 4.05.03
Office hours: TR 8-8:30, 10-11, 3:45-4:15 or by appt

Research area: U.S. History, World Civilizations

About

John Carr-Shanahan, M.A.

Lecturer II
Department of History

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Phone: 210-458-6643
Office: MH 4.04.62
Office hours: W 11-1:00 pm

Research area: U.S. History, World Civilizations

About

Robert Browning, Ph.D.

Senior Lecturer
Department of History

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Phone: 210-458-5723
Office: MH 4.05.18
Office hours: MWF 10-11 am; TR 12:30-1pm

Research area: U.S. History, Military History

About

Steven Boyd, Ph.D.

Professor
Department of History

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Phone: 210-458-5704
Office: MH 4.03.08
Office hours: S 8-9 am, 12-1 pm, 4pm or by appt

Research area: Colonial America, Constitution and Law, U.S. History

About
  • Biography

    Steven R. Boyd, Professor of History, received a B.A. from Claremont McKenna College, and an M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin. Dr. Boyd teaches courses in the American Revolution and the Law and American Society. These courses provide students with a basis for subsequent comparative work on revolutions, law, and social development in Latin America, Europe, and Asia. His early research, which examined the contract clause of the Constitution and the Whiskey Rebellion, addressed the question of why by 1789 the Constitution had been accepted as the basis for governance within the United States. In Alternative Constitutions for the United States, Dr. Boyd expanded the temporal focus of his interest in the durability of the Constitution against all challengers. His more recent work focuses on the place of the Constitution in American culture more broadly by examining the perceptions of the Constitution in American utopian novels in the late nineteenth century and by studying attitudes and ideas about the Constitution as expressed on Civil War Patriotic Envelopes at the outset of the Civil War. That latter focus is part of a larger book length study of popular attitudes in the North and South about the Constitution, the rule of law, and why men and women in both regions fought and supported their respective governments.